Category Archives: Anxiety

CES Ultra is a non-drug approach to treatment of anxiety

Anti-anxiety pills could be next U.S. drug epidemic

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults in the United States age 18 and older, or 18.1% of the population every year.

anti-anxiety-pills

Considered relatively safe and non-addictive by consumers and many doctors, Xanax, Valium, Ativan and Klonopin have been prescribed to millions of Americans for decades to calm jittery nerves and promote a good night’s sleep. But the number of people taking the sedatives and the average length of time they’re taking them have shot up since the 1990s, when doctors also started liberally prescribing opioid painkillers.

Actually anti-anxiety pills are not so safe. Due to their high potency, benzodiazepines can change the brain’s neurochemistry. Over time, the drugs build up in the user’s body. Users can develop mental and physical dependencies on the drugs as a result.

Prescriptions have increased more than 60 percent in the last two decades and overdose deaths involving them have more than quadrupled between 2002 and 2015, promptings some states to limit the number of pills a patient can be prescribed.

The growing use of anti-anxiety pills reminds some doctors of the early days of the opioid crisis. Benzodiazepines, or “benzos,” are a class of pharmaceutical drugs prescribed for a spectrum of mental disorders and ailments. They are used to treat moderate to severe anxiety, panic attacks, epileptic seizures and even withdrawal symptoms from other central nervous system depressants like alcohol. Benzodiazepines are legal when they are prescribed. However, a black market for the drugs exists as well. On the street, benzodiazepine drugs might go by other names like tranks, downers or simply benzos.

State and federal officials are now warning that excessive prescribing of a class of drugs known as benzodiazepines or “benzos” is putting more people at risk of dependence on the pills and is exacerbating the fatal overdose toll of painkillers and heroin. When taken in combination with painkillers or illicit narcotics, benzodiazepines can increase the likelihood of a fatal overdose as much as tenfold, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. On their own, the medications can cause debilitating withdrawal symptoms that last for months or years. As prescriptions for benzodiazepines have grown since the late 1990s, so have deaths, according to a study at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that overdose deaths involving benzodiazepines quadrupled from 2002 to 2015.

Benzodiazepines are a fantastic medication to deal with and to cope with infrequent and unnatural experiences. These anxiety drugs should only be reserved for infrequent procedures like a colonoscopy, or extensive dental procedure.

We don’t need chemicals to get us through the painful events of life. This is about a 20-30 year old phenomena in the US where we feel we need to cope with life using chemicals to get us through traumatic issues. Once It becomes a coping mechanism to deal with your life, we have to question what we are doing here.

While opioids’ toxic effects are respiratory depression, benzos also depress your breathing and can be fatal. The body becomes so relaxed and euphoric from drugs like Xanax, that it doesn’t feel the need to breathe, he said. Patients end up dying from an “overdose of pleasure.” In a lot of ways benzos mimic the pharmacology of alcohol. It impairs memory, it impairs cognitive ability, and literally lowers your IQ and ability to function.

Public health officials warn that people who abruptly stop taking benzodiazepines risk seizures or even death. Opioid withdrawal will make you want to die, but typically won’t kill you. Benzo withdrawal on the other hand can create withdrawal seizures that can be life threatening.

Further statistics show:

  • 65% of North Americans take prescription medications daily, 43% take mood altering prescriptions regularly.
  • There were over 3.3 Billion prescriptions filled in America in 2002 (12 times the U.S’s population – that’s 12 prescriptions for every man, woman, and child in the U.S. that year).
  • Paxil and Zoloft (two of the more popular anti-anxiety medications) ranked 7th and 8th in the top ten prescribed medications in the US (these two medications totaled almost $5 Billion in sales in 2002).

People need to rely more on talk therapy or alternative medicine to cope with their anxiety and distress, instead of counting on a magic pill.

Cranial Electortherapy Stimulation (CES) is a safe alternative to drugs. CES is a unique and viable “bioelectric” approach which enhances the homeostasis of the biological central nervous system – the tendency for intrinsic balance within a system. Isn’t it time we examined a drug-free alternative? Cranial Electrotherapy is exactly that — an effective modality with no negative side-effect.

ref:> yellowhammernews.com/addiction-expert | health.com/anxiety | anxietycentre.com

CES Anxiety Studies

There has now been almost 40 years of experience in the U.S. of CES as a non medication treatment for anxiety.

Also noteworthy is that among the more than 2000 patients who have been involved in CES studies in the U.S there has been no significant, negative side effect reported from the use of CES. As the National Research Council reported to the FDA when asked to evaluate the safety of CES, “Review of these reports reveals that significant side effects or complications attributable to the procedure are virtually nonexistent.”

ces-table

Earlier meta-analysts completed their meta-analyses by the use of published means and standard deviations. Most authors do not report these when they publish, so that among the more than 100 CES studies published in the U.S., only 8 could be found that contained that information. Two meta-analyses were performed limited to the use of these 8 studies, one at Harvard and one at the University of Tulsa Graduate School, and both concluded that CES was unquestionably effective for the treatment of anxiety.

Very early on in the U.S. the anxiety found in the substance abstinence syndrome was treated with CES. Patients who withdraw from various addictive substances suffer intensively from anxiety, depression and sleep disturbance. Because that group has proven susceptible to cross addiction to psychoactive medications, and because they are also more resistant to the effects of most of those medications than are non-addicted patients, CES soon became a treatment of choice in both inpatient and outpatient treatment programs for this group of patients.

Luckily for CES meta-analysts, there are available journals that have a history of readily publishing negative CES studies, while on occasion refusing to publish studies with positive findings. To everyone’s surprise, journal editors (or their chosen group of peer reviewers) can be biased.

A meta-analyst has succeeded if the majority of studies that are available have been identified, since it can easily be shown statistically that unless the analyst was specifically biased in the sampling procedure, the outcome would rarely be changed importantly if the remainder of the completed studies appeared in the analysis. This point will be returned to later when the standard error of the mean and the confidence limits of the effect size is discussed.

In the field of CES the analyst has an advantage in that it is a small, tightly knit field in which most researchers know what the others are doing or have published.

Ref> Dr. Ray Smith

Focus Factor Side Effects

Focus Factor® bottle, not equal to symbol, fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts
Focus Factor® bottle, not equal to symbol, fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts

Focus Factor is a memory booster that provides supplemental nutrition to help you feel sharper and more alert.

The ingredients of Focus Factor are vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, biotin, pantothenic acid, calcium, iron, iodine, magnesium, zinc, selenium, copper, manganese, chromium, molybdenum, potassium, diemethylaminoethanol, L glutamine, bacopin, L-pyroglutamic acid, phosphatidylsering, docosahexanoic acid concentrate, choline, inositol, N acetyltyrosine, bilberry fruit, GABA, Activin, vinpocetine, trace lyte, huperzine A, boron, vanadium and grape skin extract. According to the official website, Focus Factor is, America’s #1 brain health supplement.

The suggested use on the package lists Focus Factor as a dietary supplement. Recall how many vitamins it has. TOO MUCH OF ANY VITAMIN CAN CAUSE TOXICITY. Common signs of this condition include: A sudden fever, low blood pressure, HEADACHE, muscle aches, confusion, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting.

There are reports it causes headaches, as well as other side effects, when you read through the customer feedback posted online. Plus, there is no detail about the cited clinical study that supports its claims.

Before going for company-produced boosters, try what Mother Nature provides you. Balance in our diet is essential to balancing our systems.

Balance: Key To Optimal Health And Well-Being

Balance is the key to optimal health and well-being. Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) is one way to balance the neuro-chemical and hormonal processes of your physiology. CES is a non-invasive, non pharmaceutical way to achieve higher cognitive function, by using your body’s natural systems, without side effects. CES uses an extremely low frequency electrical current to coax or engage parts of the human system, responsible for rebalancing neuro-chemical and hormonal function. CES Ultra is a CES device, designed specifically for these purposes.

CES Ultra works by stimulating the limbic system and the Vagus nerve. This CES process is both safe and effective for treating insomnia, anxiety, and the repercussion of lessened cognitive function, due to a debilitating nature:

  • The better we sleep the sharper our mental acuity
  • The less depressed we are the more our awareness remains in the moment
  • The less anxious we are the more pertinent information we can retain.

Learn more about the science behind CES and the CES Ultra device.

Get Your Own CES Ultra for only $299
Rated 4.8/5 based on 18 user reviews

I am so glad that a friend of mine directed me to The CES Ultra. I have been astonished with the results. Within a few weeks I noticed a big improvement in my memory and I was more focused and alert while studying. What a great product!

Dana K.

Citations

Last Modified: December 28, 2020


Kids on Drugs (Thanks to Parents and Doctors)

Part I: The Dangers

Part II

Parents and Doctors are often overwhelmed when having to deal with ADHD kids. They often look for a shortcut—prescription drugs. Common brand names include stimulants such as Ritalin, Concerta, Adderall, Metadate, Vyvanse, and Provigil. Use of such drugs has reached epidemic proportions. The figures are staggering:

kids-on-drugs

 

More than 1 in 10 (11%) US school-aged children had received an ADHD diagnosis by a health care provider by 2011, as reported by parents.

o    6.4 million children reported by parents to have ever received a health care provider diagnosis of ADHD , including:

  • 1 in 5 high school boys
  • 1 in 11 high school girls

 

The percentage of US children 4-17 years of age with an ADHD diagnosis by a health care provider, as reported by parents, continues to increase.

o    A history of ADHD diagnosis by a health care provider increased by 42% between 2003 and 2011:

  • 7.8% had ever had a diagnosis in 2003
  • 9.5% had ever had a diagnosis in 2007
  • 11.0% had ever had a diagnosis in 2011

o    Average annual increase was approximately 5% per year

The percentage of children 4-17 years of age taking medication for ADHD, as reported by parents, increased by 28% between 2007 and 2011.

o    Percentage of children taking medication for ADHD was:

  • 4.8% in 2007
  • 6.1% in 2011

o    Average annual increase was approximately 7% per year

The average age of ADHD diagnosis was 7 years of age, but children reported by their parents as having more severe ADHD were diagnosed earlier.

o    8 years of age was the average age of diagnosis for children reported as having mild ADHD

o    7 years of age was the average age of diagnosis for children reported as having moderate ADHD

o    5 years of age was the average age of diagnosis for children reported as having severe ADHD

More US children were reported by their parents to be receiving ADHD treatment in 2011 compared to 2007, however treatment gaps may exist.

o    In 2011, as many as 17.5% of children with current ADHD were reported by their parents as not receiving either medication for ADHD or mental health counseling

o    More than one-third of children reported by their parents as not receiving treatment were also reported to have moderate or severe ADHD

The patterns in ADHD diagnosis and medication treatment showed increases in the percentages overall, however some new patterns emerged between 2007 and 2011.

o    The percentage of children reported by their parents to have a history of health care provider diagnosed ADHD increased for most demographic groups (for example, across racial groups, boys and girls) from 2003 to 2011; however,

o    Between 2007 and 2011, the percentage of children reported by their parents to have a history of a health care provider diagnosed ADHD:

  • Was similar among older teens
  • Decreased among multiracial children and children of other races when compared to black or white children

The number of US families impacted by ADHD continues to increase.

o    An estimated 2 million more children were reported by their parents to be diagnosed by a health care professional with ADHD in 2011, compared to 2003

  • By 2011, 6.4 million children were reported by their parents to be diagnosed by a health professional with ADHD compared to 4.4 million in 2003

o    An estimated 1 million more children were reported by their parents to be taking medication for ADHD in 2011, compared to 2003.

  • By 2011, 3.5 million children were reported by their parents to be taking medication for ADHD compared to 2.5 million in 2003

kids-adhd-drugs

These figures should give pause for consideration. By increasing children’s dependence on pharmaceuticals, they learn that the best and easiest way to deal with their emotional issues is by taking a drug, perfect training for their adult years and an added incentive to graduate to recreational drug use and an increased reliance and dependence on prescriptions as a pathway to health.

ADHD Drug Warnings:

There have been 44 warnings from eight countries (United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, France and Singapore) warning that ADHD drugs/stimulants cause harmful side effects. These include the following (note that some warnings cite more than one side effect, so the list below may not be equal to the total number of warnings):

  • 13 warnings on stimulants causing heart problems
  • 10 warnings on stimulants causing mania/psychosis
  • 9 warnings on stimulants causing cardiovascular problems
  • 8 warnings on stimulants causing death
  • 4 warnings on stimulants causing hallucinations
  • 4 warnings on stimulants causing depression
  • 4 warnings on stimulants causing violence, hostility or aggression
  • 4 warnings on stimulants causing seizures
  • 3 warnings on stimulants causing agitation or irritability
  • 3 warnings on stimulants causing anxiety
  • 2 warnings on stimulants causing suicide risk/attempts
  • 2 warnings on stimulants causing addiction or dependence

ADHD Drug Studies:

There are 25 studies from five countries (United States, Australia, Denmark, Canada and Italy) showing that ADHD drugs/stimulants cause harmful side effects. These include the following (note that some studies cite more than one side effect, so the list below may not be equal to the total number of studies):

  • 5 studies on stimulants causing addiction/medication abuse
  • 5 studies on stimulants causing heart problems
  • 5 studies on stimulants showing lack of efficacy of the drug
  • 4 studies on stimulants causing stunted growth
  • 2 studies on stimulants causing death
  • 1 study on stimulants causing suicide risk/attempts
  • 1 study on stimulants causing violence
  • 1 study on stimulants causing homicidal ideation
  • 1 study on stimulants causing irritability
  • 1 study on stimulants causing depression
  • 1 study on stimulants causing mania, psychosis and hallucinations

Isn't it time we examined a drug-free alternative? The CES Ultra is exactly that—a safe and effective modality with no negative side-effect

Kids on Drugs ( Thanks to Parents and Doctors) – part 2

Part 2: How CES, the Drug Free Alternative, Can Make a Difference

Part 1

One Parent’s Experience

CES Ultra Improves Sleep, Reduces Anxiety, Irritability, and Depression in 14-year-old Male

We’ve been doing a trial with the CES Ultra the past week. The subject was DS*, our 14 year old with diagnosed insomnia, anxiety, and depression. He used the unit for 20 minutes per day, at bedtime.

I would rate the improvement in apparent anxiety and depression to be significant. Anxieties are no longer a major topic of discussion. DS is starting to leave the house on his own for activities other than school. He’s walked outside for exercise many days since starting the program. Last night he performed with his school orchestra and said he didn’t feel strung out about it like he usually has in the past. He settled down well afterwards, which is a first.

Insomnia has shown moderate improvement. We had hoped for more improvement in that department, but perhaps we will see this continue over a longer term. DS does like to use it at bedtime, finds it easier to fall asleep. He is no longer asking for a prescription for sleeping pills. But still some early-morning wakening, etc.

My DH and I find our son more talkative, less defensive, and quite a bit more mellow in the past week. That is something we have not seen for a long time. Irritability has been markedly decreased … now closer to normal teenage irritability than what we endured before. I suspect the reduced anxiety and reduced depression are contributing to the mellower kid.

Side effects: DS feels dozy after using it. Would not do a treatment just before driver’s ed. No negative side effects otherwise noted.

Our family gives CES an “A” grade and a “thumbs up.” The unit’s positive effect on our anxious, depressed, irritable, insomniac teen has taken a lot of stress off of the entire family. And I must add, finding a psych doc who gave us a free (with consult) week-long trial period on the device was very helpful before making the full investment in purchase, which we plan to do.

* (For the sake of privacy, identities are withheld.)

Brief Research Study

Smith, Ray B., McCusker, Charles F., Jones, Ruth G., and Goates, Delbert T.  The use of cranial electrotherapy stimulation in the treatment of stress related attention deficit disorder, with an eighteen month follow up. Unpublished, 1991 and follow-up in 1993.

This study compared the effects of 3 randomly assigned CES devices which had marked differences in electrical stimulation parameters, in the treatment of stress related attention deficit disorder in 23 children and adults, 9 males, 14 females, 9 – 56 years old (average 30.96) with an average education level of 10.56 years. All had been diagnosed as having generalized anxiety disorder (61%), and/or depression (45%), and/or dysthymia (17%). 8 had a primary diagnosis of ADD. CES treatments were given daily, 45 minutes per day for 3 weeks. All 3 CES devices were equally effective based on Duncan’s Range test in significantly (P<.001) reducing depression as measured on the IPAT depression scale (mean of 19.38 ± 8.44 pretest to 13.19 ± 7.00 post test), state and trait anxiety scales of the STAI (mean state anxiety was reduced from 39.95 ± 11.78 pretest to 29.76 ± 6.99 post test, and the mean trait anxiety was reduced from 43.90 ± 11.31 pretest to 32.19 ± 7.50 post test), and in increasing the Verbal pretest (mean of 99.38 ± 13.20 to post test of 107.50 ± 14.13), Performance (mean of 107.4 ± 15.05 to 126.6 ± 14.2 ), and Full Scale I.Q. scores on the WISC-R or WAIS-R IQ tests (mean of 103.2 ± 13.7 to 117.6 ± 14.28). The authors concluded that in the unlikely event that our findings are the results of placebo effect alone, a CES device, retailing at approximately $795, would still be a relatively inexpensive and apparently reliable treatment for such a debilitating disorder as stress related ADD. On 18 month follow up, the pts performed as well or better than in the original study, the Full Scale IQ had not moved significantly from where it was after the first 3 weeks of treatment, the Performance IQ fell back slightly, while the Verbal IQ continued to increase. There did not seem to be any pattern of addiction to or over dependence on the CES device. There was no side effects except for 1 pt who cried during treatments, and 1 who was sore behind the ears when the electrode gel began drying out.

The cornerstone tenet of medicine is “Do no harm.” Don’t you owe it to your child to try a safe, effective, non-invasive approach before turning to drugs? Consider the CES Ultra.

Another Therapist Reports: CES Intervention Diffuses Anger, Decreases Hyper-Irritability, & Improves Health of 21-year-old Female College Student after Other Therapies Fail.