Category Archives: ADHD

CES and the non-drug alternative for your children

adhd-cesultra

From a satisfied user.

I LOVE our CES Ultra!! My 8 year old has such severe ADHD he cannot sit still to save his life!! BEFORE CES Ultra, my little guy had to take Adderall 2x/day plus Zoloft once a day for mood control because the Adderall increased aggression a LOT!! Also, the Adderall made him toss and turn until almost midnight each night! (And THAT kept big brother awake in the top bunk…) I hated it!!!

I weaned my child off meds shortly after school got out. Then I started using the CES Ultra. It made a huge difference such that even his cousin noticed! On our first visit (while still on Adderall and Zoloft), he ran all around and was into everything.

On our next visit 3-4 weeks later, my son was so much more calm, not running and not into everything!! When school started, I chickened out and did add Adderall only ONCE a day, in the morning. Eventually, I discovered essential oils and added a couple of mixes. With Adderall only in the morning, plus CES morning and after school, my child no longer tosses and turns half the night and only takes one pill/day vs. 3/day!

Kids on Drugs (Thanks to Parents and Doctors)

Part I: The Dangers

Part II

Parents and Doctors are often overwhelmed when having to deal with ADHD kids. They often look for a shortcut—prescription drugs. Common brand names include stimulants such as Ritalin, Concerta, Adderall, Metadate, Vyvanse, and Provigil. Use of such drugs has reached epidemic proportions. The figures are staggering:

kids-on-drugs

 

More than 1 in 10 (11%) US school-aged children had received an ADHD diagnosis by a health care provider by 2011, as reported by parents.

o    6.4 million children reported by parents to have ever received a health care provider diagnosis of ADHD , including:

  • 1 in 5 high school boys
  • 1 in 11 high school girls

 

The percentage of US children 4-17 years of age with an ADHD diagnosis by a health care provider, as reported by parents, continues to increase.

o    A history of ADHD diagnosis by a health care provider increased by 42% between 2003 and 2011:

  • 7.8% had ever had a diagnosis in 2003
  • 9.5% had ever had a diagnosis in 2007
  • 11.0% had ever had a diagnosis in 2011

o    Average annual increase was approximately 5% per year

The percentage of children 4-17 years of age taking medication for ADHD, as reported by parents, increased by 28% between 2007 and 2011.

o    Percentage of children taking medication for ADHD was:

  • 4.8% in 2007
  • 6.1% in 2011

o    Average annual increase was approximately 7% per year

The average age of ADHD diagnosis was 7 years of age, but children reported by their parents as having more severe ADHD were diagnosed earlier.

o    8 years of age was the average age of diagnosis for children reported as having mild ADHD

o    7 years of age was the average age of diagnosis for children reported as having moderate ADHD

o    5 years of age was the average age of diagnosis for children reported as having severe ADHD

More US children were reported by their parents to be receiving ADHD treatment in 2011 compared to 2007, however treatment gaps may exist.

o    In 2011, as many as 17.5% of children with current ADHD were reported by their parents as not receiving either medication for ADHD or mental health counseling

o    More than one-third of children reported by their parents as not receiving treatment were also reported to have moderate or severe ADHD

The patterns in ADHD diagnosis and medication treatment showed increases in the percentages overall, however some new patterns emerged between 2007 and 2011.

o    The percentage of children reported by their parents to have a history of health care provider diagnosed ADHD increased for most demographic groups (for example, across racial groups, boys and girls) from 2003 to 2011; however,

o    Between 2007 and 2011, the percentage of children reported by their parents to have a history of a health care provider diagnosed ADHD:

  • Was similar among older teens
  • Decreased among multiracial children and children of other races when compared to black or white children

The number of US families impacted by ADHD continues to increase.

o    An estimated 2 million more children were reported by their parents to be diagnosed by a health care professional with ADHD in 2011, compared to 2003

  • By 2011, 6.4 million children were reported by their parents to be diagnosed by a health professional with ADHD compared to 4.4 million in 2003

o    An estimated 1 million more children were reported by their parents to be taking medication for ADHD in 2011, compared to 2003.

  • By 2011, 3.5 million children were reported by their parents to be taking medication for ADHD compared to 2.5 million in 2003

kids-adhd-drugs

These figures should give pause for consideration. By increasing children’s dependence on pharmaceuticals, they learn that the best and easiest way to deal with their emotional issues is by taking a drug, perfect training for their adult years and an added incentive to graduate to recreational drug use and an increased reliance and dependence on prescriptions as a pathway to health.

ADHD Drug Warnings:

There have been 44 warnings from eight countries (United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, France and Singapore) warning that ADHD drugs/stimulants cause harmful side effects. These include the following (note that some warnings cite more than one side effect, so the list below may not be equal to the total number of warnings):

  • 13 warnings on stimulants causing heart problems
  • 10 warnings on stimulants causing mania/psychosis
  • 9 warnings on stimulants causing cardiovascular problems
  • 8 warnings on stimulants causing death
  • 4 warnings on stimulants causing hallucinations
  • 4 warnings on stimulants causing depression
  • 4 warnings on stimulants causing violence, hostility or aggression
  • 4 warnings on stimulants causing seizures
  • 3 warnings on stimulants causing agitation or irritability
  • 3 warnings on stimulants causing anxiety
  • 2 warnings on stimulants causing suicide risk/attempts
  • 2 warnings on stimulants causing addiction or dependence

ADHD Drug Studies:

There are 25 studies from five countries (United States, Australia, Denmark, Canada and Italy) showing that ADHD drugs/stimulants cause harmful side effects. These include the following (note that some studies cite more than one side effect, so the list below may not be equal to the total number of studies):

  • 5 studies on stimulants causing addiction/medication abuse
  • 5 studies on stimulants causing heart problems
  • 5 studies on stimulants showing lack of efficacy of the drug
  • 4 studies on stimulants causing stunted growth
  • 2 studies on stimulants causing death
  • 1 study on stimulants causing suicide risk/attempts
  • 1 study on stimulants causing violence
  • 1 study on stimulants causing homicidal ideation
  • 1 study on stimulants causing irritability
  • 1 study on stimulants causing depression
  • 1 study on stimulants causing mania, psychosis and hallucinations

Isn't it time we examined a drug-free alternative? The CES Ultra is exactly that—a safe and effective modality with no negative side-effect

Kids on Drugs ( Thanks to Parents and Doctors) – part 2

Part 2: How CES, the Drug Free Alternative, Can Make a Difference

Part 1

One Parent’s Experience

CES Ultra Improves Sleep, Reduces Anxiety, Irritability, and Depression in 14-year-old Male

We’ve been doing a trial with the CES Ultra the past week. The subject was DS*, our 14 year old with diagnosed insomnia, anxiety, and depression. He used the unit for 20 minutes per day, at bedtime.

I would rate the improvement in apparent anxiety and depression to be significant. Anxieties are no longer a major topic of discussion. DS is starting to leave the house on his own for activities other than school. He’s walked outside for exercise many days since starting the program. Last night he performed with his school orchestra and said he didn’t feel strung out about it like he usually has in the past. He settled down well afterwards, which is a first.

Insomnia has shown moderate improvement. We had hoped for more improvement in that department, but perhaps we will see this continue over a longer term. DS does like to use it at bedtime, finds it easier to fall asleep. He is no longer asking for a prescription for sleeping pills. But still some early-morning wakening, etc.

My DH and I find our son more talkative, less defensive, and quite a bit more mellow in the past week. That is something we have not seen for a long time. Irritability has been markedly decreased … now closer to normal teenage irritability than what we endured before. I suspect the reduced anxiety and reduced depression are contributing to the mellower kid.

Side effects: DS feels dozy after using it. Would not do a treatment just before driver’s ed. No negative side effects otherwise noted.

Our family gives CES an “A” grade and a “thumbs up.” The unit’s positive effect on our anxious, depressed, irritable, insomniac teen has taken a lot of stress off of the entire family. And I must add, finding a psych doc who gave us a free (with consult) week-long trial period on the device was very helpful before making the full investment in purchase, which we plan to do.

* (For the sake of privacy, identities are withheld.)

Brief Research Study

Smith, Ray B., McCusker, Charles F., Jones, Ruth G., and Goates, Delbert T.  The use of cranial electrotherapy stimulation in the treatment of stress related attention deficit disorder, with an eighteen month follow up. Unpublished, 1991 and follow-up in 1993.

This study compared the effects of 3 randomly assigned CES devices which had marked differences in electrical stimulation parameters, in the treatment of stress related attention deficit disorder in 23 children and adults, 9 males, 14 females, 9 – 56 years old (average 30.96) with an average education level of 10.56 years. All had been diagnosed as having generalized anxiety disorder (61%), and/or depression (45%), and/or dysthymia (17%). 8 had a primary diagnosis of ADD. CES treatments were given daily, 45 minutes per day for 3 weeks. All 3 CES devices were equally effective based on Duncan’s Range test in significantly (P<.001) reducing depression as measured on the IPAT depression scale (mean of 19.38 ± 8.44 pretest to 13.19 ± 7.00 post test), state and trait anxiety scales of the STAI (mean state anxiety was reduced from 39.95 ± 11.78 pretest to 29.76 ± 6.99 post test, and the mean trait anxiety was reduced from 43.90 ± 11.31 pretest to 32.19 ± 7.50 post test), and in increasing the Verbal pretest (mean of 99.38 ± 13.20 to post test of 107.50 ± 14.13), Performance (mean of 107.4 ± 15.05 to 126.6 ± 14.2 ), and Full Scale I.Q. scores on the WISC-R or WAIS-R IQ tests (mean of 103.2 ± 13.7 to 117.6 ± 14.28). The authors concluded that in the unlikely event that our findings are the results of placebo effect alone, a CES device, retailing at approximately $795, would still be a relatively inexpensive and apparently reliable treatment for such a debilitating disorder as stress related ADD. On 18 month follow up, the pts performed as well or better than in the original study, the Full Scale IQ had not moved significantly from where it was after the first 3 weeks of treatment, the Performance IQ fell back slightly, while the Verbal IQ continued to increase. There did not seem to be any pattern of addiction to or over dependence on the CES device. There was no side effects except for 1 pt who cried during treatments, and 1 who was sore behind the ears when the electrode gel began drying out.

The cornerstone tenet of medicine is “Do no harm.” Don’t you owe it to your child to try a safe, effective, non-invasive approach before turning to drugs? Consider the CES Ultra.

Another Therapist Reports: CES Intervention Diffuses Anger, Decreases Hyper-Irritability, & Improves Health of 21-year-old Female College Student after Other Therapies Fail.

CES vs. Drugs for the Treatment of ADHD

A number of studies have been conducted that show a modest connection between childhood ADHD and risk for later substance abuse (Biederman et al., 2006; Lambert & Hartsough, 1998; Mannuzza et al., 1991; Molina, Flory et al., 2007; Molina, Pelham et al., 2003;2007).  Study findings vary somewhat due to different ages of the participants, different types of samples (children recruited from treatment clinics versus children in large community survey studies), different ways of measuring substance abuse, and differing levels of attention to other problems such as conduct problems that may also be related to substance abuse.  Across a number of studies, however, there is a recurring pattern of findings that children with ADHD have an increased risk for substance abuse of one form or another.  ADHD also contributes to a faster progression from initial use to abuse, and substance abuse may follow a more aggressive course among individuals with a history of ADHD. Clearly alternative approaches to ADHD are needed.

ces-ultra-adhd

Dr. Ray Smith, Dr. Charles F. McCusker Ruth G. Jones and Dr. Delbert Goates conducted a study on the use of cranial electrotherapy stimulation in the treatment of stress related attention deficit disorder, with an eighteen month follow up. It involved 23 children and adults, 9 males, 14 females, 9 – 56 years old (average 30.96) with an average education level of 10.56 years. All had been diagnosed as having generalized anxiety disorder (61%), and/or depression (45%), and/or dysthymia (17%). 8 had a primary diagnosis of ADD. CES treatments were given daily, 45 minutes per day for 3 weeks. Results showed a significant decrease in depression as measured on the IPAT depression scale as well as in mean trait anxiety as well as a significant increase in IQ scores. On 18 month follow up, the pts performed as well or better than in the original study, the Full Scale IQ had not moved significantly from where it was after the first 3 weeks of treatment, the Performance IQ fell back slightly, while the Verbal IQ continued to increase. There did not seem to be any pattern of addiction to or over dependence on the CES device.

See also the following case study sent us by a participating physician.

CES Intervention Diffuses Anger, Decreases Hyper-Irritability, & Improves Health of 21-year-old Female College Student after Other Therapies Fail.

The patient is a twenty-one-year-old female college student whose learning disability took the form of hyperactivity turned inward where it emerged as a self punitive hyper-irritability.

Rage states could be triggered by someone in the classroom dropping a pencil nearby, a teaching assistant looking over her shoulder, a nearby student tapping his toe, someone snuffling his nose nearby, students leaving early and letting the door slam, or a teacher lecturing and writing on the board at the same time. At such times the patient would sometimes leave the room, go somewhere and cry cathartically in self anger for having become irritable.

Throughout childhood she was often sick, was known for carrying tissues at all times, could not digest her food if she ate just prior to going to school, and could not digest “junk food” snacks eaten during the school day. Anything sweet was a special digestion problem.

She could not mobilize and focus her energy for more than three hours at a time during the day, was always tired, never standing when she could sit, and never walking when she could ride. In any case, she needed to nap every three hours for ten to twenty minutes in order to make it through a school day. This she did by putting three chairs together in the library stacks and sleeping on them. Yet she had good learning and memory skills during the few calm moments of her day. She also studied better at night after the family was in bed.

Various treatments were tried with this patient, including visits to other physicians, chiropractors, educational kinesiologists, and holistic therapists. She was given enzymes, thyroid tests, massage for “tight intestines,” brain entrainment audio tapes, vitamin B shots, and work with an “alpha pacer.” The vitamin B helped her energy level when it sagged, the entrainment tapes and “alpha pacer” helped temporarily. Light and sound stimulators were not effective.

A year ago, the patient was introduced to Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) which made significant improvements early on. She used it 45 minutes per day at first, then began wearing the device also during college examinations. Presently she wears the device twice a day for an hour and a half.

Her hyper-irritability has subsided, her energy level has balanced out, she no longer carries a box of tissues everywhere she goes, and most significantly she is able to concentrate and learn with greater ease. She now gets up in the morning without encouragement, functions well in early morning classes, no longer needs to frequently nap during the day, and is completing her studies with less effort and worry. Her digestive system is functioning normally even as she continues to eat junk food.

Do you have a son or daughter suffering from ADHD? Before you start on a drug regimen, try a safe, effective alternative.

Contact us for more information

Cranial Electrotherapy Helps College Student with Learning Disability

CES Intervention Diffuses Anger, Decreases Hyper-Irritability, & Improves Health of 21-year-old Female College Student after Other Therapies Fail

Case Study:

The patient was a twenty-one-year-old female college student whose learning disability took the form of hyperactivity turned inward where it emerged as a self punitive hyper-irritability.

Rage states could be triggered by someone in the classroom dropping a pencil nearby, a teaching assistant looking over her shoulder, a nearby student tapping his toe, someone snuffling his nose nearby, students leaving early and letting the door slam, or a teacher lecturing and writing on the board at the same time. At such times the patient would sometimes leave the room, go somewhere and cry cathartically in self anger for having become irritable.

Throughout childhood she was often sick, was known for carrying tissues at all times, could not digest her food if she ate just prior to going to school, and could not digest “junk food” snacks eaten during the school day. Anything sweet was a special digestion problem.

She could not mobilize and focus her energy for more than three hours at a time during the day, was always tired, never standing when she could sit, and never walking when she could ride. In any case, she needed to nap every three hours for ten to twenty minutes in order to make it through a school day. This she did by putting three chairs together in the library stacks and sleeping on them. Yet she had good learning and memory skills during the few calm moments of her day. She also studied better at night after the family was in bed.

cesultra-not-pills

Various treatments were tried with this patient, including visits to other physicians, chiropractors, educational kinesiologists, and holistic therapists. She was given enzymes, thyroid tests, massage for “tight intestines,” brain entrainment audio tapes, vitamin B shots, and work with an “alpha pacer.” The vitamin B helped her energy level when it sagged, the entrainment tapes and “alpha pacer” helped temporarily. Light and sound stimulators were not effective.

A year ago, the patient was introduced to Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) which made significant improvements early on. She used it 45 minutes per day at first, then began wearing the device also during college examinations. Presently she wears the device twice a day for an hour and a half.

Her hyper-irritability has subsided, her energy level has balanced out, she no longer carries a box of tissues everywhere she goes, and most significantly she is able to concentrate and learn with greater ease. She now gets up in the morning without encouragement, functions well in early morning classes, no longer needs to frequently nap during the day, and is completing her studies with less effort and worry. Her digestive system is functioning normally even as she continues to eat junk food.

She observed early on with the CES and that when the device was in use “it numbed my anger” so on one occasion when she desired to feel anger, act it out, and cry as in the past she refused to wear the CES device until she had finished “having my fit.”

CES intervention was also associated with the cessation of a difficult premenstrual tension syndrome. She reports no further menstrual cramps since using the device and states “I am not witchy anymore” during her menstrual periods. She states that she is no longer bothered by the chronic fatigue that so dramatically affected her earlier learning efforts. Her educational therapist reports she is now functioning normally for an adult college student with superior intelligence.

Contact cesultra.com to discover how the CES Ultra can help you get restful sleep, enjoy peace of mind, and experience greater relaxation.