Category Archives: Alternative Health

CES Ultra is a drug-free treatment

Global Market place recognizes Cranial Electrotherapy devices

ces-global-market

With the increasingly stressful lifestyle there is also rise in other types of disorders such as anxiety and sleep disorders. With the lack of sufficient treatments that address these disorders, cranial electrotherapy stimulation comes as an innovative and required treatment.

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) device is a small device that stimulates the cranium and brain with a current less than 4 mA, which cannot be sensed by the patient. The cranial electrotherapy stimulation is approved by the FDA for the treatment of insomnia, depression and anxiety. Besides, it has potential application in the treatment of a number of disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHA), obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), cognitive dysfunction, traumatic brain injury, pain, enhancing attention and concentration, and for reducing assaultive behavior.

A relatively large number of the population across the globe is diagnosed with such disorders. A significant portion of the U.S. population is affected by poor mental health, which leads to development of various kinds of mental health disorders. The treatment method is complementary and an alternative of medicine. There are large number of clinical trials currently active, which have proved the CES device as an effective treatment method. For an instance, as of 2017 the Sham Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation by Electromedical Products International Inc. is under clinical trial and is currently recruiting candidates for the same.

The increasing number of cases of poor mental health with the development of disorders such as depression, anxiety and other sleep disorders is driving the growth of the market. Although animal studies have proved this device to be effective, the adoption of these devices is affected due to lack of strong evidence in humans proving the efficacy of the devices in all or most of the cases. However, there are a number of new clinical trials in the recruiting stage, which may help fill the gap in the market.

Use of Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation in Hospitals and the Growing Demand of Wearable Type of Devices
There are various types of cranial electrotherapy stimulator devices and they can be broadly classified based on the type of electrode placement, such as invasive or transcranial and non-invasive or wearable. The wearable type is the dominant segment in the market. The wearable type device is user-friendly and does not requires surgical insertion of the electrode. Most of the FDA-approved devices are suitable for the treatment of insomnia, depression and anxiety, as the prevalence of these disorders is increasing, in which depression is the most common and growing disorder in the young population. Since most of these devices are available only in prescribed hospitals and mental health clinics, they have a large scope as end-use segments in the market.

Regional Market Outlook

North America has a large number of mental health cases, which has increased the use of the device in the region. Also, growing awareness regarding the treatment of mental health along with technological advancements make North America a potential market for electrotherapy stimulation devices. Likewise, growing awareness in other regions such as Asia Pacific, there is a scope for rapid development in the region.


There are three major cranial electrotherapy stimulation devices, namely the CES Ultra by Neuro-fitnesss LLC, Alpha-Stim M and the Alpha-Stim AID by Electromedical Products International (EPI), and the Fisher-Wallace Simulator. Other FDA-approved products include BR-2 Biorest (Biorest Inc), Biotron 18 (Biotronics Corp), Elexoma Medic (Redplane AG), FM 10/C (Johari Digital Healthcare Ltd.), and HP-1 Heathpax or Nurtipax (Health Directions Inc), among others.

REF:> digitaldaynews.com | by Div Kolher

Great Neuroscience Discoveries of 2018

2018 was when neuroscience made the impossible possible. Here are four neuroscience findings from 2018 that still blow our minds as we kick off the New Year.

Electrical implant restores walking in paralyzed patients

2018 was, without doubt, a breakthrough year for restoring mobility in paralyzed patients.

The technology is several years in the making, with initial positive results in monkeys. It works by implanting a neuroprosthesis into the spinal cord to bypass the site of injury by artificially stimulating remaining nerves.

In September, the Mayo Clinic reported the extraordinary case of Jered Chinnock, who was paralyzed at the waist in 2013. After getting the implant, he walked half the length of a football field. Another report showed that electrical stimulation in four cases was able to help some paralyzed patients go home and get around with only a walker.

Less than a month later, yet another team reported that electrical stimulation using a wireless implant helped three paralyzed patients walk with the aid of crutches or a walker. After a few months of training, the patients could more easily move around even when the stimulation was off, suggesting that the regime had helped remaining healthy nerves rework their connections to adapt and heal.

Electrical stimulation isn’t the only treatment in the works. Another study found that human stem cells, when implanted into monkeys, could synapse with the recipient’s own neurons and restore natural movement after spinal cord injury. These therapies—although expensive and in their infancy—lay a promising road ahead for returning mobility to paralyzed patients.

CRISPR barcodes map brain development in exquisite detail

The developing mammalian brain consists of an intricately-choreographed dance of newborn neurons, with each adopting its specific identity and migrating to its home base in the brain. Scientists have long hoped to examine the process in detail, which could help uncover secrets of brain development—and how it goes wrong.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, tracing the history of every single one of the billions of developing cells in the brain has been impossible—until CRISPR came along.

Last August, a team used CRISPR to generate a unique genetic barcode for every single cell in the mouse brain. By reading the barcodes, scientists were able to retrace a cell’s entire history in the developing brain. Like genetic sleuths, the scientists reconstructed entire cellular family trees to show how cells relate to one another.

A new type of neuron in the cortex that’s potentially uniquely human

Perhaps shockingly, even today neuroscientists are still uncovering new cellular components that make up our mighty brains. Last year saw the discovery of giant neurons within the claustrum, a thin sheet of cells that some believe is the seat of consciousness.

This year, the Allen Institute in Seattle is back at it with another finding: rosehip neurons, each containing dense bundles of processes around the cell’s center that make it look like a rose after shedding its petals.

These neurons make up nearly 15 percent of neurons in the outermost layer of the brain that supports high-level cognitive functions. Remarkably, rosehip neurons have never before been seen in mice or other well-studied lab animals. Although the team can’t yet fully conclude that they’re specific to humans, their scarcity within the animal kingdom is intriguing.

The next step is figuring out the functions of these rose-like neurons—in particular, are they partly why our brains are special?—and whether they are linked to neuropsychiatric disorders.

Gut-brain connection grows stronger with direct anatomical link

One of the hottest research trends in neuroscience is the link between the brain and the gut—often dubbed the “little brain.”

The human gut is lined with over 100 million nerve cells that allow it to talk to the brain, letting us know when we’re hungry or when we’ve over-indulged. But it’s not all digestion: scientists are increasingly realizing that the gut could contribute to anxiety, depression, or more controversially, cognition.

Last year scientists found a new set of informational highways that directly link the gut to the brain. Within the gut, enteroendocrine cells pump out hormones that kick off digestion and suppress hunger. These cells have little foot-like protrusions that look remarkably like synapses—the structure that neurons use to talk to each other using chemicals.

With the help of a glow-in-the-dark rabies virus, which can jump from synapse to synapse, the team found that enteroendocrine cells directly link to neurons in the vagus nerve—a giant nerve that runs from the brain to vital organs such as the heart and lungs. What’s more, they chat with their partners using classical neurotransmitters including glutamate and serotonin, which work much faster than hormones.

Another study found that the gut directly links to the brain’s reward centers through the vagus nerve. Using lasers to zap sensory neurons in the gut of mice, the scientists found increased levels of mood-boosting dopamine in their brains.

These new connections could explain why vagus nerve stimulation is potentially helpful for those with severe depression. More relevant to the holiday season, it also could explain why eating makes us feel warm and fuzzy.

Uncovering the gut-brain connection is gaining steam as a research field. Eventually, the findings could lead to new treatments for disorders linked to a malfunctioning gut—for example, obesity, eating disorders, depression, or even autism.

ref:. singularityhub.com | discoverieshub.com

The Science of Stress

stress-face

Long before scientists began shedding light on how our minds and bodies actually affect one another, an intuitive understanding of this dialogue between the body and the emotions, or feelings, emerged and permeated our very language: We use “ sick” as a grab-bag term for both the sensory symptoms — fever, fatigue, nausea — and the psychological malaise, woven of emotions like sadness and apathy.

Pre-modern medicine, in fact, has recognized this link between disease and emotion for millennia. Ancient Greek, Roman, and Indian Ayurvedic physicians all enlisted the theory of the four humors — blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm — in their healing practices, believing that imbalances in these four visible secretions of the body caused disease and were themselves often caused by the emotions. These beliefs are fossilized in our present language — melancholy comes from the Latin words for “black” (melan) and “bitter bile” (choler), and we think of a melancholic person as gloomy or embittered; a phlegmatic person is languid and impassive, for phlegm makes one lethargic.

For nearly three centuries, the idea that our emotions could impact our physical health remained scientific taboo — setting out to fight one type of dogma, Descartes had inadvertently created another, which we’re only just beginning to shake off. It was only in the 1950s that Austrian-Canadian physician and physiologist Hans Selye pioneered the notion of stress as we now know it today, drawing the scientific community’s attention to the effects of stress on physical health and popularizing the concept around the world.

Modern medicine’s advances in cellular and molecular biology, which have made it possible to measure how our nervous system and our hormones affect our susceptibility to diseases as varied as depression, arthritis, AIDS, and chronic fatigue syndrome.

The same parts of the brain that control the stress response … play an important role in susceptibility and resistance to inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. And since it is these parts of the brain that also play a role in depression, we can begin to understand why it is that many patients with inflammatory diseases may also experience depression at different times in their lives… Rather than seeing the psyche as the source of such illnesses, we are discovering that while feelings don’t directly cause or cure disease, the biological mechanisms underlying them may cause or contribute to disease. Thus, many of the nerve pathways and molecules underlying both psychological responses and inflammatory disease are the same, making predisposition to one set of illnesses likely to go along with predisposition to the other.

Mood is not homogeneous like cream soup. It is more like Swiss cheese, filled with holes. The triggers are highly specific, tripped by sudden trails of memory: a faint fragrance, a few bars of a tune, a vague silhouette that tapped into a sad memory buried deep, but not completely erased. These sensory inputs from the moment float through layers of time in the parts of the brain that control memory, and they pull out with them not only reminders of sense but also trails of the emotions that were first connected to the memory. The same sensory input can trigger a negative emotion or a positive one, depending on the memories associated with it.

This is where stress comes in — much like memory mediates how we interpret and respond to various experiences, a complex set of biological and psychological factors determine how we respond to stress. Some types of stress can be stimulating and invigorating, mobilizing us into action and creative potency; others can be draining and incapacitating, leaving us frustrated and hopeless. This dichotomy of good vs. bad stress is determined by the dose and duration of the stress hormones secreted by the body in response to the stressful stimulus.

Extended exposure to stress, especially to a variety of stressors at the same time — any combination from the vast existential menu of life-events like moving, divorce, a demanding job, the loss of a loved one, and even ongoing childcare — adds up a state of extreme exhaustion that leads to what we call burnout.

Among the major stressors — which include life-events expected to be on the list, such as divorce and the death of a loved one — is also one somewhat unexpected situation. An unfamiliar environment is a universal stressor to nearly all species, no matter how developed or undeveloped.

ref:> https://experiencelife.com | https://www.sciencedaily.com | https://www.edutopia.org | https://getpocket.com/explore

Laughter is the best medicine

Laughter decreases stress hormones and increases immune cells and infection-fighting antibodies, thus improving your resistance to disease. Laughter triggers the release of endorphins, the body’s natural feel-good chemicals. Endorphins promote an overall sense of well-being and can even temporarily relieve pain.

Here are our favorite Xmas cartoons. Enjoy!

xmas-ces-1

xmas-ces-2

xmas-ces-3

xmas-ces-4

xmas-ces-5

Weird and wonderful world of sleep technology

These gadgets aren’t just tracking your sleep — although many of them do that, too. Some are designed to help you fall asleep more quickly by calming your brain or making your environment more conducive to rest.

sleep-technology

Somnox Sleep Robot

This bean-shaped Somnox Sleep Robot is about the size of a small cushion, and pulses as it mimics soft breathing and emits soft music to help you get to sleep. “It’s a sleep robot that helps you get to sleep faster, but also sleep longer,” says Julian Jagtenburg, a robotics engineer and Founder of Somnox.

The sensation of feeling with one hand the falling and rising of a breathing robot is odd indeed, but the soft sounds of falling rain/ambient music/the purring of a cat give the robot an unquestionably calming influence, while its sensors enable it to switch off the moment you fall asleep.

Beddit

This is a great sleep sensor (a small strip that goes under your sheets) that uses a highly accurate method (cardioballistic sensors- very sensitive cardiac monitoring) to identify sleep parameters (you have different heart rate, breathing etc while in each sleep stage). In addition, it can communicate with other sensors in your home to help guide your environment for better sleep (e.g., Nest). One of its many great features is the set-it-and-forget-it mode, where you do not have to turn it on each evening. Beddit gives advice based on sleep, noticing needs for exercise, or if your nutrition is effecting your sleep ( these are all self-reported by the customer and then linked to their sleep variables). There is a smart alarm feature, that will wake you up from a lighter stage of sleep, and the app allows you to review your data easily.

Recovery Sleepwear

Brady UnderArmour has developed sleepwear where printed on the inside of the textile is a ceramic reflective technology using Far Infrared. According to their literature: “The soft bioceramic print on the inside of the garment absorbs the body’s natural heat and reflects Far Infrared back to the skin. This helps your body recover faster, promotes better sleep, reduces inflammation, and regulates cell metabolism.” An independent study was done on this technology where sleep was improved in animals and one insomniac. It feels like a cool idea.

SmartSleep headband

Why wear a Fitbit when you could sleep in some ridiculous-looking headgear? Designed partly in response to research showing that 40% of people between the ages of 25 and 54 have less than the recommended seven hours sleep per night, SmartSleep is a soft-touch, lightweight headband with two sensors. The sensors collect delta waves of the deep sleep phase, with Smart Sleep then amplifying them to intensify deep sleep, and also minutely recording sleep phases. Unlike other sleep trackers that only monitor a user’s sleep pattern, SmartSleep can actively help people sleep more restoratively. The headgear is charged via USB, and links to a SleepMapper app via Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

HUMU Augmented Audio Cushion

We’ve seen pillows with built-in speakers before, as we have gaming chairs that vibrate, but this Audio Cushion combines the two. A reasonably firm pillow-cum-neck support that contains two vibrating sound boards, it takes any source of audio and produces a rippling, resonating effect that accentuates bass and low frequencies. Connecting to a tablet, laptop or phone via Bluetooth or a 3.5mm jack, HUMU is able to produce a wider range of frequencies than any speakers or headphones, although it nevertheless seems most likely to be destined for strapping to a gaming chair.

BedJet, a climate control system for beds

The BedJet smart comforter is a one-of-a-kind system that uses forced air and a smartphone app to help you regulate your temperatures while sleeping. The BedJet’s blower sends hot or cool air, depending on your preference, through a hose that is connected to the provided comforter. The comforter, which is more like a dual-layer flat sheet, fills with air that keeps you comfortable. The “smart” label comes into play because you can pair the BedJet with your phone using the app. This allows you to program different temperature settings throughout the night. The BedJet V2 Climate Comfort System is an expensive item but it can fill the role of other appliances, such as fans, space heaters, and more.

Glo to Sleep Mask

This is no simple eye mask—in fact, it almost looks like a pair of goggles. Once you put on the mask, you see a blue glowing light on the inside of it. As the light fades away, you are supposed to drift along with it into dreamland. A bonus is that the thick foam surrounding the mask claims to block out any extra light that could impact your sleep.

Courtesy of CES 2018 https://www.tomsguide.com/t/ces/