Category Archives: Stress

CES Ultra is a non-drug approach to treatment stress

Anxiety And Weight Gain Through Trying Times

Masked, Overweight Man Standing On A Scale With Arms Raised In Displeasure
Masked, Overweight Man Standing On A Scale With Arms Raised In Displeasure

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a direct effect on the anxiety levels of all of us. Those who suffer from the symptoms of anxiety can find their symptoms heightened further due to the added stresses of trying times. Anxiety produces long term stress. Long term stress has been linked to a host of physical and mental health issues. Long term stress may result in damage to organs and DNA, memory loss, insomnia, and possibly higher blood pressure risk. So, it should come as no surprise that anxiety may also affect a person’s body weight. But weight gain and anxiety have a complex relationship. Below, we will explore how anxiety is related to weight gain and what you can do to maintain a healthier body weight.

Weight Gain Before and After

The first thing to note is that weight gain is not the type of symptom that occurs on a whim, nor is it uncontrollable even when it is related to anxiety.

You should also note that weight gain is still weight gain like any other. Even if it is linked to anxiety, healthy diet and exercise is important, and something you should strongly consider both for your weight and for your anxiety.

Anxiety Can Cause Weight Gain

Weight gain can be a symptom of anxiety. But anxiety does not always cause weight gain. That is because the relationship is fairly complicated. The causes of gaining weight from anxiety are as follows:

  • Cortisol Stress Hormone

    The key reason that some people with anxiety have trouble managing their weight is because of the stress hormone cortisol. Cortisol is released during times of stress, which means that it is also released during anxiety. Cortisol causes fat to build up around the midsection and is one of the primary reasons that those with stress have trouble maintaining their weight.

  • Excess Eating Behavior

    In some people, anxiety can also trigger excess eating. This may occur for two reasons. First, some people find that food provides a valuable coping tool, because it may release endorphins which improve the mood. Second, some people experience more hunger when they are stressed. Not everyone experiences either of these reactions, which is why not everyone gains weight. The differences may also be very subtle, and you may not realize you are eating more than you used to.

  • Inactivity

    In addition, some people find that anxiety is very draining. They may sleep more, or they may sit at home more than they used to. This level of inactivity means that they are burning fewer calories, which in turn means they gain more weight. Due to the restrictions we have had to endure during the pandemic, inactivity has become even more pronounced than usual.

What is interesting is that some people experience the opposite. There are those that struggle to get hungry when they are stressed, and those that find that when they have anxiety they need to be constantly moving. Every person reacts to anxiety differently, which is one of the reasons it does not always seem like weight gain is a symptom.

Weight Gain Can Cause Anxiety

Another reason that anxiety and weight gain have a complex relationship is because weight gain – or rather, the reasons that people gain weight – can also cause anxiety.

Inactivity is one of the reasons that some people develop anxiety. The body needs to move. It was designed to move. Those that do not exercise are considerably more likely to develop anxiety disorders.

Weight gain can also lead to poor breathing habits, which are known to trigger anxiety symptoms and panic attacks. Unhealthy foods may also contribute to anxiety – although they rarely cause it – and poor sleeping habits and aging can lead to both weight gain and anxiety even though the two are unrelated.

Some people also become more anxious when they gain weight simply because they lose confidence in themselves. All of these are reasons why the relationship between anxiety and weight is so complex.

How to Control Your Anxiety Related Weight Gain

It does not matter what causes you to gain weight. Diet and exercise are still the most effective solutions. Make sure that you are eating healthy with the right calories, and that you are exercising regularly. There is no magic pill that will cause you to lose weight – in fact, many diet pills and diets can actually increase anxiety. You simply need to start taking care of your body, and your weight will follow.

The good news is that exercise and healthy eating are actually incredibly effective tools for combating anxiety as well. So, in a way, it does not matter which comes first – you are reducing both when you start exercising regularly.

A Final Thought About Stress and Anxiety Treatment

Combining regular exercise, healthy eating, and Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) give you an enhanced way to combat anxiety-related weight gain. Data from clinical studies and practical application reflect the positive results that may be gained by applying low amplitude, extremely low frequency (ELF) electric currents, through the Vagus nerve system. The CES Ultra cranial electrotherapy stimulator device incorporates both ELF currents and ear clip attachments, as part of its standard application to treat stress and anxiety without medication.

Get Your Own CES Ultra for only $299
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Feel Like A New Person

My body had actually lost its ability to fall asleep naturally and now, just the thoughts of going to sleep had become a great source of daily stress and anxiety for me. So bad was this problem that when it was actually time for me to go to bed… I would lie there wide awake for hours. The CES Ultra gave me my life back, and I feel like a new person again.

Wayne R.

Citations

Last Modified: May 18, 2021

Constant stress can pump up the number of fat cells we generate and cause weight gain

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Stress can make you fat. And it’s not entirely because you stress eat.

Researchers found that chronic stress may pump up the rate in which new fat cells are formed. It all comes down to levels of hormones called glucocorticoids, which are produced in abundance when we’re stressed.

When glucocorticoids are constantly high, as is the case when we’re chronically stressed out, it can boost the chances for a certain type of cell to morph into fat cells, the study found. And that could bump up our weight.

It’s long been known that rises in the stress hormone cortisol can lead to weight gain in humans, but the assumption has been that people were just eating more because the hormone stimulates appetite.

Suspecting something else might be going on, the Stanford researchers studied the effects of glucocorticoids — a steroid hormone produced in the adrenal gland — both in individual cells and in mice.

Under a microscope the researchers saw how the hormone, when kept at constant high levels, caused the development of fat cells. Intriguingly, if the levels rose and fell, there was no impact. And that was true even if glucocorticoid levels were extremely high, but for a limited period of time. So basically, it’s not about food intake, it’s about timing.

So maybe it’s OK to get stressed during the day, but not at night.

“It would suggest that any method people can use to beat stress could be of benefit,” Dr. Anthony Heaney, an endocrinologist and an associate professor of medicine and neurosurgery at the University of California, said.

The kinds of activities that might help are those “that need 100 percent of our attention,” Heaney said. That could mean a game of tennis over running on a treadmill, for example.

“Certain activities we do are not absorbing enough to distract from stress, you can sometimes still ruminate and be stressed because it doesn’t require your sole attention.”

Try CES Ultra. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) directly reduces anxiety and stress. CES balances your brain’s chemistry, allowing you to be at peace with yourself again.

ref> https://www.today.com/health

Operation Pro-Vet

The Problem

Tens of thousands of Iraqi and Afghan veterans have returned home from the wars with a debilitating condition: post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The VA is at loose ends about how to deal with a mental health crisis that is ruining not only the lives of returning vets, but those of their families and friends as well. Drug therapy, which is the main way they have treated the problem, has proven to be not only ineffective, but has worsened the situation, triggering an extraordinary spike in substance abuse, leading to violent behaviors and suicide.

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Read Brig. General (Ret) Stephen Xenakis MD, on the plight of our veterans at Huffingtonpost – PBS’s ‘This Emotional Life’: Memorial Day — Remembering Military Suicides

Watch General Xenakis on Fox News, discussing how CES can help treat PTSD at FoxNews – Can Brain Stimulation Help with PTSD?

An Answer?

Fortunately, there is a non-drug option with a proven track record in treating anxiety, depression, and insomnia which are the primary symptoms of PTSD. It’s called cranial electrotherapy stimulation, or CES. It’s an electronic device that is simple to use, has no side effects, and has been validated by decades of research. CES is currently being prescribed for active duty personnel returning from the mid-east at the Warrior Combat Stress Reset Program at Ft. Hood, TX, at Ft. Campbell, KY, Ft. Joint Ft Lewis-McChord, WA, at the Bremerton WA Naval Hospital, as well as in combat conditions in Iraq and Afghanistan. It should not stop there.

Operation Pro-Vet: How You Can Help

CES units generally retail for $350-$995. Because they are not generally covered by health insurance, they are most often out of the reach of veterans most of whom have a limited income or who are currently unemployed. Neuro-Fitness LLC, the manufacturer of the CES Ultra—in recognition of those who have given so much for their country—will now make available its CES unit at wholesale cost to veterans, not only of our current wars but our past wars as well as to their families. We are also working with Service clubs to make available units at a special low cost so that they may then be distributed to veterans in need.

To learn more about CES, visit us at our website: https://www.cesultra.com/. To learn more about the program, call us at 1-425-222-0830 or email us today at sales@ cesultra.com for more information and how your local group or organization can become part of this program to assist those who have served on our behalf. They deserve nothing less.

Why Psychiatry needs CES

The prime directive – Do No Harm

The primary duty to patients should be to “do no harm”. Avoiding harm typically results in an approach that follows a spectrum of interventions beginning with treatments that pose the least risk of adverse side effects.

The harm reduction approach increases the likelihood patients will benefit without being exposed to unnecessary risks of harm. CES should be included in the spectrum of available treatments as it poses very low risk of harm to patients.

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CES as a safe and effective alternative

People worried about the use of pharmaceutical drugs should consider CES as a safe and effective alternative

The FDA has expressed concern as to utilization of CES without first employing more “conventional” treatments. Unfortunately, the more conventional treatments at times are not only ineffective but also in many circumstances contribute to a worsening of the condition or result in deleterious side effects.

This can result in necessary therapeutic alliance adversely impacted. Frequently, patients will mention the advertisements they see on television by various attorneys soliciting patients who have been harmed by approved medications, ECT or other treatments. They are worried about being harmed by prescribed treatments and become suspicious of their health care professionals.

There is excellent data and clinical experience however to support the safety and lack of adverse side effects from CES and it should be included in the spectrum of available treatments as it poses very low risk of harm to patients.

Excerpts from “A View from the Trenches” written by Jason Worchel, M.D.

More CES Research – https://www.cesultra.com/research-resources.php

CES has been shown to reduce the levels of stress hormones

There are numerous CES studies in which CES has been shown to reduce the levels of stress hormones in the body. Usually this reduction is found to be in connection with a rebalanced relationship between stress related hormones and other hormones with which they are normally in balance in non stress states.

For example, Pozos and his team found that CES could bring back into homeostatic balance the neurotransmitter dopamine that had been deliberately thrown out of balance in an animal preparation, thus removing Parkinson like symptoms that he had induced with the imbalance earlier.

Gold and his coworkers found that CES could bring back into homeostatic balance the endorphin-norepinephrine system in the brains of withdrawing human addicts, thus eliminating the major stress of the drug abstinence syndrome.

Similar results were found in an animal preparation by Dougherty and his coworkers at the University of Texas.

Shealy studied stress hormones specifically in a group of 164 patients who were severely depressed and found abnormal levels of melatonin, norepinephrine, beta-endorphin, serotonin and cholinesterase ranging widely throughout the group.

Since similarly depressed patients had routinely responded well to CES in the past, he selected another group of 37 chronic pain patients whose pain was nonresponsive to usual treatments, and who were also depressed. He studied their stress hormone levels before and following CES treatment. He found pre-post changes in serotonin, beta-endorphin, norepinephrine and cholinesterase in the patients following stimulation with CES, 20 minutes a day for two weeks. Forty-four percent of the chronic pain patients reported significant improvement in their pain and required no additional treatment. The depressed patients reported 50% clinical improvement in their depression, often bringing them back within the normal range.

In searching for the mechanism with which CES induced these changes, Shealy studied the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) vs. blood plasma in 10 normal subjects prior to and following 20 minutes of CES stimulation. He found changes in melatonin, serotonin, norepinephrine, beta-endorphin and cholinesterase in both the CSF and blood plasma, but with greater changes in the blood plasma, in each instance. He concluded that CES activated a hypothalamic response that resulted in a body-wide change in the levels of those stress realted biochemicals.

While inflammation was not measured in the above studies, in so far as stress hormones can engender the inflammation response CES could be inferred to be a significant treatment in reducing inflammation in the body, along with the myriad medical pathologies that accompany it.

As a typical follow on to stress engendered inflammation, Ware notes that psychological stress and depression have been established as important risk factors for coronary heart disease, while Cassels found that approximately 30% of adults with diabetes have comorbid depression, which is associated with poor metabolic control, more complications, increased healthcare use and costs, reduced quality of life, greater disability and lost productivity, and higher mortality rates.