Global Market place recognizes Cranial Electrotherapy devices

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With the increasingly stressful lifestyle there is also rise in other types of disorders such as anxiety and sleep disorders. With the lack of sufficient treatments that address these disorders, cranial electrotherapy stimulation comes as an innovative and required treatment.

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) device is a small device that stimulates the cranium and brain with a current less than 4 mA, which cannot be sensed by the patient. The cranial electrotherapy stimulation is approved by the FDA for the treatment of insomnia, depression and anxiety. Besides, it has potential application in the treatment of a number of disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHA), obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), cognitive dysfunction, traumatic brain injury, pain, enhancing attention and concentration, and for reducing assaultive behavior.

A relatively large number of the population across the globe is diagnosed with such disorders. A significant portion of the U.S. population is affected by poor mental health, which leads to development of various kinds of mental health disorders. The treatment method is complementary and an alternative of medicine. There are large number of clinical trials currently active, which have proved the CES device as an effective treatment method. For an instance, as of 2017 the Sham Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation by Electromedical Products International Inc. is under clinical trial and is currently recruiting candidates for the same.

The increasing number of cases of poor mental health with the development of disorders such as depression, anxiety and other sleep disorders is driving the growth of the market. Although animal studies have proved this device to be effective, the adoption of these devices is affected due to lack of strong evidence in humans proving the efficacy of the devices in all or most of the cases. However, there are a number of new clinical trials in the recruiting stage, which may help fill the gap in the market.

Use of Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation in Hospitals and the Growing Demand of Wearable Type of Devices
There are various types of cranial electrotherapy stimulator devices and they can be broadly classified based on the type of electrode placement, such as invasive or transcranial and non-invasive or wearable. The wearable type is the dominant segment in the market. The wearable type device is user-friendly and does not requires surgical insertion of the electrode. Most of the FDA-approved devices are suitable for the treatment of insomnia, depression and anxiety, as the prevalence of these disorders is increasing, in which depression is the most common and growing disorder in the young population. Since most of these devices are available only in prescribed hospitals and mental health clinics, they have a large scope as end-use segments in the market.

Regional Market Outlook

North America has a large number of mental health cases, which has increased the use of the device in the region. Also, growing awareness regarding the treatment of mental health along with technological advancements make North America a potential market for electrotherapy stimulation devices. Likewise, growing awareness in other regions such as Asia Pacific, there is a scope for rapid development in the region.


There are three major cranial electrotherapy stimulation devices, namely the CES Ultra by Neuro-fitnesss LLC, Alpha-Stim M and the Alpha-Stim AID by Electromedical Products International (EPI), and the Fisher-Wallace Simulator. Other FDA-approved products include BR-2 Biorest (Biorest Inc), Biotron 18 (Biotronics Corp), Elexoma Medic (Redplane AG), FM 10/C (Johari Digital Healthcare Ltd.), and HP-1 Heathpax or Nurtipax (Health Directions Inc), among others.

REF:> digitaldaynews.com | by Div Kolher

The history of the medical use of electricity

electric sleep machine

The history of the medical use of electricity goes back more than 2000 years.  In AD 46, the Roman physician, Scribonius Largus wrote his Compositiones Medicae,  recommending patients stand on a live black torpedo fish to relieve gout and other pain.  To do this they waded out into shallow water in the ocean and stood on the fish (presumably against its will).

Much later, Claudius Galen (131-201 AD) was still recommending the use of shock from electrical fish for various medical therapies.  Galen’s word was “law” in medical circles for several thousand years, as was his recommended use of electric fish.

Electricity was not generally known and used separately (from fish) in medicine until the 1700s, when various medical devices were developed and used.  An earlier researcher developed an electrical device that could be used to shock a heart that had stopped beating into beating again.  The church stopped that treatment very quickly by saying that bringing dead people back to life was the work of the devil.

By the time John Wesley and his brother and their friends left the Anglican Church and began Methodism which took the Word directly to the people in the streets of London, they also set up medical clinics for the treatment of the indigent.  In each of those clinics they installed electrical treatment devices.

By the turn of the 20th century, the vast majority – some say more than 90% – of physician’s offices in large U.S. cities, such as New York City, had electrical treatment devices on hand.

CES from the early 1900s to 1953 and beyond

While electricity had been used in medicine for some time, in the early 1900s researchers in Europe began trying to find a way to use electricity to put people to sleep.  They tried different pulse rates, various intensities of stimulation, direct and alternating (biphasic) current and so forth.  They found that if they used a strong enough current, they could put patients into unconsciousness, but the patient tended to regain consciousness the minute the current was turned off.

electrosleep

In 1953 Russian scientists began using 100 pulses per second, limited to from 1 to 4 milliamperes of current, which tended to relax patients and allow them to proceed to a restful sleep.  Current was passed through the head with an electrode over each closed eyelid and one over each mastoid process behind the ears.  The device was the Somniatron, and the treatment was called “electrosleep.”

Chionophobia and how to cope with it

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Chionophobia, or intense fear of snow, is a type of phobia categorized as a natural environment phobia.

The word originates from Greek chion meaning snow and phobos meaning fear, aversion or dread. People with Chionophobia often understand that their fear is unfounded and weird. However, they are unable to control it.

Overview

Chionophobia is not just a dislike of snow or a rational fear of severe weather forecasts, it is an irrational fear of snow that is typically linked to a fear of bodily harm or death. Though phobias can and do manifest themselves differently in different people’s experiences, there are typically two primary fears behind chionophobia: the fear of becoming snowbound and the fear of being stranded in snow.

Symptoms

Like all phobias, the fear of snow may cause a variety of symptoms. Paying undue attention to weather reports, refusing to leave home during snowy weather, and experiencing panic attacks are extremely common in people with chionophobia. For people with true chionophobia, the mere forecast of a winter storm or snowfall can induce physiological symptoms of fear and anxiety-like cold sweats, panic attacks, and even an unrealistic feeling of doom and dread.

Coping

The best methods for coping with the fear of snow depend on the severity and the level of impact that your fear has on your life. Some people find that becoming educated about different types of snow and their effects on local conditions can calm their fears. Others find that gradual exposure to winter activities is calming. If your fear is severe or life-limiting, however, seek the guidance of a trained mental health professional. Winter weather is a fact of life, but with proper assistance and hard work, there is no reason for it to seriously curtail your life when faced with snowy winter weather.

Living with chionophobia is not easy, especially during the winter or in places where snow is the way of life. Friends and family may ignore the phobia, thinking the sufferer is attention seeking. However, for the phobic, this is a real and serious phobia that interferes with your everyday life.

According to a study carried out by the American Meteorological Society, chionophobia is the second most prevalent natural environment phobia subtype.

If you are anxious about a snow storm coming, and your anxiety is becoming greater and greater – do not wait until it reaches the level of a phobia. You can use Cranial Electrotherapy neuro stimulation to reduce anxiety. CES balances your brain’s chemistry, allowing you to be at peace with yourself again. Many experience this immediately in the course of treatment; others, hours, or several days after. CES leaves you feeling both relaxed and alert. The effect differs from pharmaceutical treatments in that people report their body as feeling lighter and more relaxed and their mind, more alert and clearer. Results are cumulative and lasting. And unlike drugs, CES has no negative side effects. It is non-addictive and you can use it safely as often as you like.

ref:> verywellmind.com, cesultra.com

Snowed in with CES Ultra

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It’s snowing again. CES Ultra’s employees are fighting the snow in their cars trying to reach the office. Good luck everyone. Drive safe. Or simply stay at home, grab your CES Ultra and relax on a sofa.

Great Neuroscience Discoveries of 2018

2018 was when neuroscience made the impossible possible. Here are four neuroscience findings from 2018 that still blow our minds as we kick off the New Year.

Electrical implant restores walking in paralyzed patients

2018 was, without doubt, a breakthrough year for restoring mobility in paralyzed patients.

The technology is several years in the making, with initial positive results in monkeys. It works by implanting a neuroprosthesis into the spinal cord to bypass the site of injury by artificially stimulating remaining nerves.

In September, the Mayo Clinic reported the extraordinary case of Jered Chinnock, who was paralyzed at the waist in 2013. After getting the implant, he walked half the length of a football field. Another report showed that electrical stimulation in four cases was able to help some paralyzed patients go home and get around with only a walker.

Less than a month later, yet another team reported that electrical stimulation using a wireless implant helped three paralyzed patients walk with the aid of crutches or a walker. After a few months of training, the patients could more easily move around even when the stimulation was off, suggesting that the regime had helped remaining healthy nerves rework their connections to adapt and heal.

Electrical stimulation isn’t the only treatment in the works. Another study found that human stem cells, when implanted into monkeys, could synapse with the recipient’s own neurons and restore natural movement after spinal cord injury. These therapies—although expensive and in their infancy—lay a promising road ahead for returning mobility to paralyzed patients.

CRISPR barcodes map brain development in exquisite detail

The developing mammalian brain consists of an intricately-choreographed dance of newborn neurons, with each adopting its specific identity and migrating to its home base in the brain. Scientists have long hoped to examine the process in detail, which could help uncover secrets of brain development—and how it goes wrong.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, tracing the history of every single one of the billions of developing cells in the brain has been impossible—until CRISPR came along.

Last August, a team used CRISPR to generate a unique genetic barcode for every single cell in the mouse brain. By reading the barcodes, scientists were able to retrace a cell’s entire history in the developing brain. Like genetic sleuths, the scientists reconstructed entire cellular family trees to show how cells relate to one another.

A new type of neuron in the cortex that’s potentially uniquely human

Perhaps shockingly, even today neuroscientists are still uncovering new cellular components that make up our mighty brains. Last year saw the discovery of giant neurons within the claustrum, a thin sheet of cells that some believe is the seat of consciousness.

This year, the Allen Institute in Seattle is back at it with another finding: rosehip neurons, each containing dense bundles of processes around the cell’s center that make it look like a rose after shedding its petals.

These neurons make up nearly 15 percent of neurons in the outermost layer of the brain that supports high-level cognitive functions. Remarkably, rosehip neurons have never before been seen in mice or other well-studied lab animals. Although the team can’t yet fully conclude that they’re specific to humans, their scarcity within the animal kingdom is intriguing.

The next step is figuring out the functions of these rose-like neurons—in particular, are they partly why our brains are special?—and whether they are linked to neuropsychiatric disorders.

Gut-brain connection grows stronger with direct anatomical link

One of the hottest research trends in neuroscience is the link between the brain and the gut—often dubbed the “little brain.”

The human gut is lined with over 100 million nerve cells that allow it to talk to the brain, letting us know when we’re hungry or when we’ve over-indulged. But it’s not all digestion: scientists are increasingly realizing that the gut could contribute to anxiety, depression, or more controversially, cognition.

Last year scientists found a new set of informational highways that directly link the gut to the brain. Within the gut, enteroendocrine cells pump out hormones that kick off digestion and suppress hunger. These cells have little foot-like protrusions that look remarkably like synapses—the structure that neurons use to talk to each other using chemicals.

With the help of a glow-in-the-dark rabies virus, which can jump from synapse to synapse, the team found that enteroendocrine cells directly link to neurons in the vagus nerve—a giant nerve that runs from the brain to vital organs such as the heart and lungs. What’s more, they chat with their partners using classical neurotransmitters including glutamate and serotonin, which work much faster than hormones.

Another study found that the gut directly links to the brain’s reward centers through the vagus nerve. Using lasers to zap sensory neurons in the gut of mice, the scientists found increased levels of mood-boosting dopamine in their brains.

These new connections could explain why vagus nerve stimulation is potentially helpful for those with severe depression. More relevant to the holiday season, it also could explain why eating makes us feel warm and fuzzy.

Uncovering the gut-brain connection is gaining steam as a research field. Eventually, the findings could lead to new treatments for disorders linked to a malfunctioning gut—for example, obesity, eating disorders, depression, or even autism.

ref:. singularityhub.com | discoverieshub.com