Category Archives: Insomnia

CES Ultra is a non-drug approach to treatment insomnia

Coping with Anxiety Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

Stressed Man in Home Quarantine, Coping with Anxiety During Coronavirus Pandemic
Stressed Man in Home Quarantine, Coping with Anxiety During Coronavirus Pandemic

Living through the uncertainties of the coronavirus pandemic is raising anxiety levels, especially among people sheltering in place. This is a new experience for people who do not suffer from anxiety disorders under normal circumstances. Their anxiety can act as an innate tool to aid in adapting to situations or circumstances, preparing them to move forward in an appropriate manner. For people who suffer from anxiety disorders even in the best of times, the current pandemic adds layers of stress, thus making coping with anxiety extremely difficult.

Coping with Anxiety Strengthens You and Your Social Network

Increased stress and anxiety during an infectious disease outbreak can include:

  • Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your friends and loved ones
  • Changes in sleep and eating patterns
  • Difficulty sleeping (insomnia) or concentrating
  • Worsening of chronic health problems
  • Worsening of mental health conditions such as anxiety, depression and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Increased use of alcohol, or other drugs.

The CES Ultra is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulated medical device with allowable medical claims for anxiety, depression and insomnia. As such, the CES Ultra is an ideal method of treatment (modality) for our current shelter in place experience.

Get Your Own CES Ultra for only $299

Everyone Reacts Differently to Stressful Situations

Person Coping with Anxiety by Using a CES Ultra Device
Person Coping with Anxiety by Using a CES Ultra Device

How you respond to the outbreak can depend on your background, the things that make you different from other people, and the community in which you live. People who might respond more strongly to the stress of a crisis include:

  • Older people and people with chronic diseases who are at higher risk for severe illnesses from COVID-19
  • Children and teens
  • People who are helping with the response to COVID-19, such as doctors, nurses, other health care providers, and first responders
  • People with pre-existing mental health conditions including PTSD, Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Chronic Anxiety and problems with substance use.

Having the right information is imperative for peace of mind and taking proper action. Passing useful information to those we meet can be helpful in calming some of the fears and anxiety.

Great Uncertainty Heightens Fear and Anxiety

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we find ourselves in a position of great uncertainty. Physical isolation, changing facts and financial insecurity heighten fear and anxiety.

Physical Isolation (Quarantine)

Human beings are social creatures. For the majority of us, isolating from friends, family and the rest of our fellow travelers is contrary to who and how we are. This fact alone can make physical isolation mentally challenging, even for the most stable among us. Physical isolation becomes precarious for people with pre-existing physical or mental challenges. Not knowing how long we will need to maintain our status of relative quarantine adds to the angst of the situation for all of us.

The Constant Changing Facts of the Illness

Every week the experts are giving us new and different information about the virus itself. The range of possible COVID-19 symptoms is ever widening, making it more difficult to identify treatments.

The fact that the science on COVID-19 is unknown makes the situation even more difficult for the average person to understand. It is unnerving to know that the best minds on our planet have yet to identify solid facts.

Financial Insecurity

With no immediate end to the pandemic in sight and the world economy halted, people naturally are concerned about their financial security. The consequences already have become dire for some people. Twenty-six million people have lost jobs, many living a day-to-day existence. Having no idea what will come next or when things will begin to improve can lead one’s mind to worst possible financial scenarios.

Get Help Coping with Your Anxiety

Get help coping with anxiety amid the coronavirus pandemic. Your suffering is both real and natural. Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) is a safe and effective way to reduce your anxiety, without medication. The CES Ultra is an FDA regulated and registered CES device for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and insomnia. Experience the relaxing benefits of the CES Ultra device when coping with your anxiety.

Get Your Own CES Ultra for only $299
Rated 4.8/5 based on 18 user reviews

Citations

Last Modified: May 2, 2020

A New Treatment for Insomnia? NO! NO! NO!

sleep-treatment

NuCalm, a manufacturer of a topical cream and dietary supplements, that are designed to counteract adrenaline sleep system (for only $89.99 a bottle), has created a sleep system at the heart of which is CES (cranial electroterapy stimulation).

In New York City, the only other place people can get NuCalm is at a handful of dentists’ offices, where the system is used on anxiety-prone patients before some treatments, and at ReCOVER, an athlete-focused recovery studio that just opened.

“Without sleep, everything else, all that exercise and eating right, is moot,” says personal trainer Aaron Drogoszewski, who is also a co-founded the studio.

This is how a customer describes her experience with NuCalm at ReCOVER:

My session begins in a leather recliner chair. A personal trainer has me rub a gel on my neck that he says will “block adrenaline.” The gel contains GABA, a neurotransmitter, and L-Theanine, an amino acid. They work together to open up the GABA receptors in your brain so that the body can relax, claims Solace Lifesciences, the 16-year-old company behind the NuCalm system. These ingredients are generally recognized as safe by the FDA — but are not cleared for use as a sleep therapy.

The trainer then sticks two electrodes to my neck, which will send low pulses of electric currents to my brain to calm my nerves. Admittedly, this does not sound relaxing at all, but I trust that the FDA knew what it was doing when it cleared this type of treatment — cranial electrotherapy stimulation — for treating insomnia, depression and anxiety in 1979.

Next, he hands me noise-canceling headphones that play “binaural beats” — it sounds like your average spa soundtrack, but with separate, slightly different inaudible frequencies delivered to each ear. When heard together, the brain perceives these “binaural beats” as a totally different sound, and some studies have suggested they can boost mood, lower anxiety and improve focus. I cover my eyes with a light-blocking eye mask — the kind that lets you open your eyes and still be in darkness — and he tucks me in with a blanket.

Skeptical of the purported calming effects, I try to think of the things that commonly stress me out, but find them hard to fixate on. I alternate between feeling awake and on the cusp of sleep. After what feels like about 15 minutes, I emerge from my relaxed state to discover I had been out for a whopping 55 minutes.

“You just lose track of time,” I was told as I check my phone to find out what I missed.

When I remove my headphones, eye shades and electrodes, I don’t feel groggy, as I usually do after a nap, nor do I feel the need to drink coffee, as I usually do after basically anything. But I also don’t feel the need to work — it may have done its job a little too well.

While some of NuCalm components, such as the binaural beats and the cranial electrotherapy stimulation, have been studied, NuCalm itself hasn’t, says Dr. Daniel Barone, sleep medicine expert at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian. “But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t work,” says Barone, who wrote the book “Let’s Talk About Sleep.”

ReCOVER offers NuCalm for $75 an hour as a way for fitness buffs to de-stress and recover after muscle-straining workouts, or to anyone who just isn’t getting good sleep.

If you like going to a spa or recovery center to relax go to ReCOVER and try their new relaxation system.

Why pay $75/hour plus more for a cream, and have to go to a spa, when you can own the unit for the cost of five visits, but have the ability to, use it whenever and wherever you like at your own convenience and leisure. CES Ultra can be your personal cranial electrotherapy stimulation device which you can use whenever you want it.

“The Telomere Effect” – Why Sleep Is so Crucial for Your Telomeres

ces-telomeres-help-sleep

We all have health spans – the number of years we remain healthy, active and disease-free – and the shortening of our telomeres contributes to ageing and our entry from health span into disease span. But we can [do things that] affect our telomerase and telomeres, that can delay entry from health span to disease span. So we are talking more about keeping people healthier for longer and staving off some diseases of ageing. This is not about extreme life span extension – though of course staying healthier longer does have a reflection in mortality rates.

People who get roughly 7 hours of sleep a night tend to have longer telomeres. People who get five hours or less have much shorter telomeres.

Think about the last time you felt sleep-deprived. Your body probably felt tired and achy, your attention was all over the place, you forgot some important information, or you felt irritable towards those around you. Maybe you spent too much money at Starbucks for an afternoon caffeine boost or ran a stop sign. What you might not have noticed is that poor sleep mucks with your regulation of emotions as well. Sleep deprivation amplifies our emotions (both positive and negative) and makes our stress responses larger—cue an awkward, aggressive rant at the coworker who definitely stole your stapler.

Getting even one night of poor sleep can throw our hormones out of whack. We may develop high levels of cortisol (the stress hormone), and insulin (the hormone that regulates our blood sugar), and ghrelin (a hormone that makes us hungry). That’s why sleep deprivation is thought to be one of the major highways to obesity.

Getting full sleep restoration on subsequent nights can normalize these changes.

Chronic sleep deprivation affects us on a cellular level. Not surprisingly, your telomeres like being well-rested just as much as you do–people who get roughly 7 or more hours of sleep a night tend to have longer telomeres, especially among the elderly. People who get five hours or less have much shorter telomeres. Hedge your bets and get 7 or more hours of sleep as often as you can.

There are other aspects of disrupted sleep that are also associated with shorter telomeres. Sleep apnea creates oxidative stress, a chemical known to shorten telomeres. It’s thus not surprising that sleep apnea appears to be linked to shorter telomeres. Insomnia and snoring also appear to matter.

Studies have linked longer telomeres with better brainpower, a reduced risk of diseases, and a longer life. And here’s the part relevant to all of us: Getting good sleep quality is related to longer telomeres.

Elizabeth Blackbrun — along with Jack. W. Szostak and Carol W. Greider — was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for her help in discovering “how chromosomes are protected by telomeres.”

REF:
https://www.theguardian.com/science
http://www.elle.com/life-love/a43029/telomeres-and-sleep/
https://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-and-body

Sleeping More Will Curb Your Sugar Cravings

sleep-not-eat-sugar

Is the trick to cutting cravings for sugary foods as simple as getting a good night’s sleep? A new small study from the United Kingdom suggests that may be the case.

Earlier research has shown that more than one-third of U.S. adults get 6 hours or less of sleep each night — less than the recommended 7 to 9 hours, according to the study. With that in mind, the researchers chose to examine whether a sleep consultation could help adults get more shut-eye and how doing so might affect their daily nutrient intake.

Spending an extra 90 minutes in bed may not seem like the obvious way to lose weight, but according to a new study, it could be the key to shedding excess pounds.

Scientists from King’s College London have discovered that people who sleep for longer are less likely to pick sugary treats, or reach for comforting carbohydrates.

Lack of sleep was already known to be a risk factor for obesity because it alters levels of hormones which control appetite.

But a new study showed that by getting more sleep, people naturally choose healthier foods within a week, eating on average 10 grams less sugar each day.

In the study, the researchers recruited 21 individuals to participate in a 45-minute sleep consultation designed to extend their sleep time by up to 1.5 hours per night. Another group of 21 participants were also recruited but did not receive intervention in their sleep patterns, therefore serving as the control group, according to the study.

The results showed that the participants who increased the amount of sleep they got each night reduced their added sugar intake by as much as 10 grams the next day compared with the amount of sugar they consumed at the beginning of the study. These participants also had a lower daily carbohydrate intake than the group that did not extend their sleep patterns, the study found.

Getting a good night’s sleep:

Go to bed at roughly the same time every day, even at weekends. Lie-ins make it harder to get to sleep the next night, setting you up for a troubled week.

Avoid screens late at night, especially laptops and tablets. The bright, close light tricks your brain into thinking it is earlier in the day.

Begin winding down for at least an hour before getting into bed, allowing your brain to slow down. Intense activity, be it work or exercise, will keep you awake even if it tires you out.

Keep drinking water. Dehydration is the primary cause of ‘shallow’ sleep, so while you don’t want to wake up needing the loo, take on enough fluids to stop yourself waking up thirsty.

Never go to bed hungry, but eat the right foods before bed. Turkey, warm milk, honey, camomile and Marmite are all recommended.

Use Cranial Electrotherapy to sleep better

Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) uses a gentle electrical impulse applied to the ear lobes that is anatomically transferred to the brain. By allowing the brain to “reset” to its normal rhythms, CES creates a new and healthy habit for your sleep patterns. CES unit is handheld, and is designed to be used at home. Studies show that within two weeks of daily CES use you will see a substantial decline in your sleep problems.

ref: livescience.com / independent.ie / ufl.edu / thetimes.co.uk

Focus Factor Side Effects

Focus Factor® bottle, not equal to symbol, fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts
Focus Factor® bottle, not equal to symbol, fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts

Focus Factor is a memory booster that provides supplemental nutrition to help you feel sharper and more alert.

The ingredients of Focus Factor are vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, biotin, pantothenic acid, calcium, iron, iodine, magnesium, zinc, selenium, copper, manganese, chromium, molybdenum, potassium, diemethylaminoethanol, L glutamine, bacopin, L-pyroglutamic acid, phosphatidylsering, docosahexanoic acid concentrate, choline, inositol, N acetyltyrosine, bilberry fruit, GABA, Activin, vinpocetine, trace lyte, huperzine A, boron, vanadium and grape skin extract. According to the official website, Focus Factor is, America’s #1 brain health supplement.

The suggested use on the package lists Focus Factor as a dietary supplement. Recall how many vitamins it has. TOO MUCH OF ANY VITAMIN CAN CAUSE TOXICITY. Common signs of this condition include: A sudden fever, low blood pressure, HEADACHE, muscle aches, confusion, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting.

There are reports it causes headaches, as well as other side effects, when you read through the customer feedback posted online. Plus, there is no detail about the cited clinical study that supports its claims.

Before going for company-produced boosters, try what Mother Nature provides you. Balance in our diet is essential to balancing our systems.

Balance: Key To Optimal Health And Well-Being

Balance is the key to optimal health and well-being. Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) is one way to balance the neuro-chemical and hormonal processes of your physiology. CES is a non-invasive, non pharmaceutical way to achieve higher cognitive function, by using your body’s natural systems, without side effects. CES uses an extremely low frequency electrical current to coax or engage parts of the human system, responsible for rebalancing neuro-chemical and hormonal function. CES Ultra is a CES device, designed specifically for these purposes.

CES Ultra works by stimulating the limbic system and the Vagus nerve. This CES process is both safe and effective for treating insomnia, anxiety, depression, and the repercussion of lessened cognitive function, due to a debilitating nature:

  • The better we sleep the sharper our mental acuity
  • The less depressed we are the more our awareness remains in the moment
  • The less anxious we are the more pertinent information we can retain.

Learn more about the science behind CES and the CES Ultra device.

Get Your Own CES Ultra for only $299
Rated 4.8/5 based on 18 user reviews

Citations

Last Modified: February 7, 2020