Category Archives: Insomnia

CES Ultra is a non-drug approach to treatment insomnia

A New Treatment for Insomnia? NO! NO! NO!

sleep-treatment

NuCalm, a manufacturer of a topical cream and dietary supplements, that are designed to counteract adrenaline sleep system (for only $89.99 a bottle), has created a sleep system at the heart of which is CES (cranial electroterapy stimulation).

In New York City, the only other place people can get NuCalm is at a handful of dentists’ offices, where the system is used on anxiety-prone patients before some treatments, and at ReCOVER, an athlete-focused recovery studio that just opened.

“Without sleep, everything else, all that exercise and eating right, is moot,” says personal trainer Aaron Drogoszewski, who is also a co-founded the studio.

This is how a customer describes her experience with NuCalm at ReCOVER:

My session begins in a leather recliner chair. A personal trainer has me rub a gel on my neck that he says will “block adrenaline.” The gel contains GABA, a neurotransmitter, and L-Theanine, an amino acid. They work together to open up the GABA receptors in your brain so that the body can relax, claims Solace Lifesciences, the 16-year-old company behind the NuCalm system. These ingredients are generally recognized as safe by the FDA — but are not cleared for use as a sleep therapy.

The trainer then sticks two electrodes to my neck, which will send low pulses of electric currents to my brain to calm my nerves. Admittedly, this does not sound relaxing at all, but I trust that the FDA knew what it was doing when it cleared this type of treatment — cranial electrotherapy stimulation — for treating insomnia, depression and anxiety in 1979.

Next, he hands me noise-canceling headphones that play “binaural beats” — it sounds like your average spa soundtrack, but with separate, slightly different inaudible frequencies delivered to each ear. When heard together, the brain perceives these “binaural beats” as a totally different sound, and some studies have suggested they can boost mood, lower anxiety and improve focus. I cover my eyes with a light-blocking eye mask — the kind that lets you open your eyes and still be in darkness — and he tucks me in with a blanket.

Skeptical of the purported calming effects, I try to think of the things that commonly stress me out, but find them hard to fixate on. I alternate between feeling awake and on the cusp of sleep. After what feels like about 15 minutes, I emerge from my relaxed state to discover I had been out for a whopping 55 minutes.

“You just lose track of time,” I was told as I check my phone to find out what I missed.

When I remove my headphones, eye shades and electrodes, I don’t feel groggy, as I usually do after a nap, nor do I feel the need to drink coffee, as I usually do after basically anything. But I also don’t feel the need to work — it may have done its job a little too well.

While some of NuCalm components, such as the binaural beats and the cranial electrotherapy stimulation, have been studied, NuCalm itself hasn’t, says Dr. Daniel Barone, sleep medicine expert at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian. “But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t work,” says Barone, who wrote the book “Let’s Talk About Sleep.”

ReCOVER offers NuCalm for $75 an hour as a way for fitness buffs to de-stress and recover after muscle-straining workouts, or to anyone who just isn’t getting good sleep.

If you like going to a spa or recovery center to relax go to ReCOVER and try their new relaxation system.

Why pay $75/hour plus more for a cream, and have to go to a spa, when you can own the unit for the cost of five visits, but have the ability to, use it whenever and wherever you like at your own convenience and leisure. CES Ultra can be your personal cranial electrotherapy stimulation device which you can use whenever you want it.

“The Telomere Effect” – Why Sleep Is so Crucial for Your Telomeres

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We all have health spans – the number of years we remain healthy, active and disease-free – and the shortening of our telomeres contributes to ageing and our entry from health span into disease span. But we can [do things that] affect our telomerase and telomeres, that can delay entry from health span to disease span. So we are talking more about keeping people healthier for longer and staving off some diseases of ageing. This is not about extreme life span extension – though of course staying healthier longer does have a reflection in mortality rates.

People who get roughly 7 hours of sleep a night tend to have longer telomeres. People who get five hours or less have much shorter telomeres.

Think about the last time you felt sleep-deprived. Your body probably felt tired and achy, your attention was all over the place, you forgot some important information, or you felt irritable towards those around you. Maybe you spent too much money at Starbucks for an afternoon caffeine boost or ran a stop sign. What you might not have noticed is that poor sleep mucks with your regulation of emotions as well. Sleep deprivation amplifies our emotions (both positive and negative) and makes our stress responses larger—cue an awkward, aggressive rant at the coworker who definitely stole your stapler.

Getting even one night of poor sleep can throw our hormones out of whack. We may develop high levels of cortisol (the stress hormone), and insulin (the hormone that regulates our blood sugar), and ghrelin (a hormone that makes us hungry). That’s why sleep deprivation is thought to be one of the major highways to obesity.

Getting full sleep restoration on subsequent nights can normalize these changes.

Chronic sleep deprivation affects us on a cellular level. Not surprisingly, your telomeres like being well-rested just as much as you do–people who get roughly 7 or more hours of sleep a night tend to have longer telomeres, especially among the elderly. People who get five hours or less have much shorter telomeres. Hedge your bets and get 7 or more hours of sleep as often as you can.

There are other aspects of disrupted sleep that are also associated with shorter telomeres. Sleep apnea creates oxidative stress, a chemical known to shorten telomeres. It’s thus not surprising that sleep apnea appears to be linked to shorter telomeres. Insomnia and snoring also appear to matter.

Studies have linked longer telomeres with better brainpower, a reduced risk of diseases, and a longer life. And here’s the part relevant to all of us: Getting good sleep quality is related to longer telomeres.

Elizabeth Blackbrun — along with Jack. W. Szostak and Carol W. Greider — was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for her help in discovering “how chromosomes are protected by telomeres.”

REF:
https://www.theguardian.com/science
http://www.elle.com/life-love/a43029/telomeres-and-sleep/
https://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-and-body

Sleeping More Will Curb Your Sugar Cravings

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Is the trick to cutting cravings for sugary foods as simple as getting a good night’s sleep? A new small study from the United Kingdom suggests that may be the case.

Earlier research has shown that more than one-third of U.S. adults get 6 hours or less of sleep each night — less than the recommended 7 to 9 hours, according to the study. With that in mind, the researchers chose to examine whether a sleep consultation could help adults get more shut-eye and how doing so might affect their daily nutrient intake.

Spending an extra 90 minutes in bed may not seem like the obvious way to lose weight, but according to a new study, it could be the key to shedding excess pounds.

Scientists from King’s College London have discovered that people who sleep for longer are less likely to pick sugary treats, or reach for comforting carbohydrates.

Lack of sleep was already known to be a risk factor for obesity because it alters levels of hormones which control appetite.

But a new study showed that by getting more sleep, people naturally choose healthier foods within a week, eating on average 10 grams less sugar each day.

In the study, the researchers recruited 21 individuals to participate in a 45-minute sleep consultation designed to extend their sleep time by up to 1.5 hours per night. Another group of 21 participants were also recruited but did not receive intervention in their sleep patterns, therefore serving as the control group, according to the study.

The results showed that the participants who increased the amount of sleep they got each night reduced their added sugar intake by as much as 10 grams the next day compared with the amount of sugar they consumed at the beginning of the study. These participants also had a lower daily carbohydrate intake than the group that did not extend their sleep patterns, the study found.

Getting a good night’s sleep:

Go to bed at roughly the same time every day, even at weekends. Lie-ins make it harder to get to sleep the next night, setting you up for a troubled week.

Avoid screens late at night, especially laptops and tablets. The bright, close light tricks your brain into thinking it is earlier in the day.

Begin winding down for at least an hour before getting into bed, allowing your brain to slow down. Intense activity, be it work or exercise, will keep you awake even if it tires you out.

Keep drinking water. Dehydration is the primary cause of ‘shallow’ sleep, so while you don’t want to wake up needing the loo, take on enough fluids to stop yourself waking up thirsty.

Never go to bed hungry, but eat the right foods before bed. Turkey, warm milk, honey, camomile and Marmite are all recommended.

Use Cranial Electrotherapy to sleep better

Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) uses a gentle electrical impulse applied to the ear lobes that is anatomically transferred to the brain. By allowing the brain to “reset” to its normal rhythms, CES creates a new and healthy habit for your sleep patterns. CES unit is handheld, and is designed to be used at home. Studies show that within two weeks of daily CES use you will see a substantial decline in your sleep problems.

ref: livescience.com / independent.ie / ufl.edu / thetimes.co.uk

Why Psychiatry needs CES (Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation)

INSOMNIA

Many patients benefit from improving sleep hygiene and as a treatment for insomnia.

Others may improve using a sleep phase changes or treating the underlying problem such as sleep apnea, medical conditions, alcohol abuse, etc.

For many others, recent pharmacologic treatments prove effective and have minimal side effects. Targeting melatonin receptors is a novel and promising approach.

For many persons, however, existing treatments are ineffective, too expensive, result in side effects or conflict with their desire to avoid medications. Some side effects from medications are very disturbing, such as sleep associated behaviors that result in harm to self or others. For others, there is morning sedation, drug/drug interactions or rebound insomnia. When behavioral interventions are not effective, CES could be considered prior to initiating medications.

ANXIETY

There are many non-pharmacologic interventions for reducing anxiety. Some of these include dietary supplements, acupuncture, meditation, yoga, and exercise. These interventions, however, are not employed by a large segment of society that suffers from anxiety. These persons instead seek medications from their physician to alleviate their suffering. Typical classes of medications for anxiety include the SSRI’s, benzodiazepines as well as the off label use of antihistamines and atypical antipsychotic medications and antiepileptic medications. In addition to the inherent problems with SSRI’s, there are also problems with the other classes of medications. A serious potential side effect of benzodiazepines is their potential for inducing physical and psychological dependence. In addition, withdrawal symptoms can prove life threatening, especially with the shorter acting benzodiazepines like alprazolam. When taken as directed, which is often not the case; this class of medications can result in compromised coordination, slowed reaction time, falls, disinhibition, delirium, and anterograde amnesia.

It is not uncommon to see suicide attempts involving a combination of a benzodiazepines together with alcohol and/or another sedative hypnotic. While buspirone is relatively well tolerated, it has poor efficacy and a 3 to 4 week lag time to have an effect. Medications such as gabapentin are used off label but there is no research to support its efficacy for anxiety disorders. Unfortunately, physicians have begun using the atypical antipsychotic medications to treat anxiety. This class of medications has a large and increasing number of very serious side effects. Recent attention has been focused on their causing metabolic syndrome. They frequently cause extra pyramidal side effects, sedation, elevated prolactin levels and drug/drug interactions. All of these medications should be avoided during pregnancy and used with caution in the elderly. In short, the side effect profile of current pharmacologic treatments for anxiety limits their safe use.

DEPRESSION

There is considerable controversy regarding the efficacy for evidence based treatments for depression. The controversy also involves the risk/benefit analyses of currently approved interventions. While the primary focus has been on medications, similar concerns have been raised regarding certain psychotherapies, transcranial electromagnetic stimulation, vagal nerve stimulation, ECT and herbal and dietary supplements.

Through articles published in the lay press, the general public has been apprised of the controversy involving the efficacy of antidepressant medications. For example, Time magazine recently cited Kirsch’s meta-analysis in PLoS Medicine that found little benefit of antidepressants for most patients as well as Dr. John Krystal’s findings that about 25% of patients did worse on antidepressants than on placebo”. They have been informed about the black box warnings for SSRI’s causing suicidal behaviors. One of the results of this publicity is a growing movement away from all medications to “holistic” or “folk remedies”. In fact, there many patients express fears of taking medications.

There is excellent data and clinical experience however to support the safety and lack of adverse side effects from CES and it should be included in the spectrum of available treatments as it poses very low risk of harm to patients.

Excerpts from “A View from the Trenches” written by Jason Worchel, M.D.

More CES Research – http://www.cesultra.com/research-resources.htm

One more reason to get a good night’s sleep

Sleep. It’s something we spend about a third of our lives doing, but do any of us really understand what it’s all about?

Two thousand years ago, Galen, one of the most prominent medical researchers of the ancient world, proposed that while we’re awake, our brain’s motive force, its juice, would flow out to all the other parts of the body, animating them but leaving the brain all dried up, and he thought that when we sleep, all this moisture that filled the rest of the body would come rushing back, rehydrating the brain and refreshing the mind. Now, that sounds completely ridiculous to us now, but Galen was simply trying to explain something about sleep that we all deal with every day. See, we all know based on our own experience that when you sleep, it clears your mind, and when you don’t sleep, it leaves your mind murky. But while we know a great deal more about sleep now than when Galen was around, we still haven’t understood why it is that sleep, of all of our activities, has this incredible restorative function for the mind.

We’ve found that sleep may actually be a kind of elegant design solution to some of the brain’s most basic needs, a unique way that the brain meets the high demands and the narrow margins that set it apart from all the other organs of the body.

So almost all the biology that we observe can be thought of as a series of problems and their corresponding solutions, and the first problem that every organ must solve is a continuous supply of nutrients to fuel all those cells of the body. In the brain, that is especially critical; its intense electrical activity uses up a quarter of the body’s entire energy supply, even though the brain accounts for only about two percent of the body’s mass. So the circulatory system solves the nutrient delivery problem by sending blood vessels to supply nutrients and oxygen to every corner of our body.

The blood vessels form a complex network that fills the entire brain volume. They start at the surface of the brain, and then they dive down into the tissue itself, and as they spread out, they supply nutrients and oxygen to each and every cell in the brain.

Now, just as every cell requires nutrients to fuel it, every cell also produces waste as a byproduct, and the clearance of that waste is the second basic problem that each organ has to solve. This diagram shows the body’s lymphatic system, which has evolved to meet this need. It’s a second parallel network of vessels that extends throughout the body. It takes up proteins and other waste from the spaces between the cells, it collects them, and then dumps them into the blood so they can be disposed of.

So how, then, does the brain solve its waste clearance problem? Well, that seemingly mundane question is where our group first jumped into this story, and what we found as we dove down into the brain, down among the neurons and the blood vessels, was that the brain’s solution to the problem of waste clearance, it was really unexpected. It was ingenious, but it was also beautiful. Let me tell you about what we found.

The brain has this large pool of clean, clear fluid called cerebrospinal fluid. We call it the CSF. The CSF fills the space that surrounds the brain, and wastes from inside the brain make their way out to the CSF, which gets dumped, along with the waste, into the blood. So in that way, it sounds a lot like the lymphatic system, doesn’t it? But what’s interesting is that the fluid and the waste from inside the brain, they don’t just percolate their way randomly out to these pools of CSF.

Instead, there is a specialized network of plumbing that organizes and facilitates this process. You can see that in these videos. Here, we’re again imaging into the brain of living mice. The frame on your left shows what’s happening at the brain’s surface, and the frame on your right shows what’s happening down below the surface of the brain within the tissue itself. We’ve labeled the blood vessels in red, and the CSF that’s surrounding the brain will be in green. Now, what was surprising to us was that the fluid on the outside of the brain, it didn’t stay on the outside. Instead, the CSF was pumped back into and through the brain along the outsides of the blood vessels, and as it flushed down into the brain along the outsides of these vessels, it was actually helping to clear away, to clean the waste from the spaces between the brain’s cells. If you think about it, using the outsides of these blood vessels like this is a really clever design solution, because the brain is enclosed in a rigid skull and it’s packed full of cells, so there is no extra space inside it for a whole second set of vessels like the lymphatic system. Yet the blood vessels, they extend from the surface of the brain down to reach every single cell in the brain, which means that fluid that’s traveling along the outsides of these vessels can gain easy access to the entire brain’s volume, so it’s actually this really clever way to repurpose one set of vessels, the blood vessels, to take over and replace the function of a second set of vessels, the lymphatic vessels, to make it so you don’t need them. And what’s amazing is that no other organ takes quite this approach to clearing away the waste from between its cells. This is a solution that is entirely unique to the brain. …. From ted.com

Watch more videos – www.youtube.com/cesultra
CES Ultra: The best way to help you get the sleep you need : Effective, safe, and drug-free.
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