Category Archives: Aging

CES Ultra for healthy aging

Endorphines, ces and aging process

Depleted supplies of “feel good” transmitters means it will be impossible for you to feel happy, upbeat, motivated or on track. You will feel just the opposite: A decrease in energy and interest, feelings of worthlessness and a pervasive sense of helplessness to control the course of your life.

neuro-transmitters

In addition to a change in mood, some scientists say that endorphins make our immune system stronger, lower blood pressure and could even slow down our body’s aging process.

Endorphins have anti-aging effect by removing Superoxide: The oxygen coming into the body from breathing can change into a Superoxide. This is one of the biggest enemies for human causing diseases and aging.

Some scientists claim that Endorphins can remove this harmful Superoxide by facilitating the production of ‘SOD’ (Superoxide Dismutase). This is possible because the Endorphins can keep the brain cells young and healthy. SOD is the enzyme which neutralized the toxicity of the harmful Superoxide. Therefore Endorphins have anti-aging effect.

Scientists now know of at least seven chemicals in the endorphin family that have effects on memory and learning. Endorphins, according to neuroscientists, “serve as the body’s ‘natural reward system,’ providing us with a rush of pleasure whenever we learn something or act in some way that is conducive to our survival as a species.” This means that new belief system designed to effect desirable behavior changes, if presented to the mind when it is flooded with endorphins, may be perceived as beneficial and adopted as such.

Memory

You can improve your memory by the help of endorphins because they can keep the brain cells young and healthy. They will help you to maintain a harmonious relationship with your colleagues. You will also be able to think creatively and have more endurance

Immune system

Endorphins enhance our immune system: When they are secreted, they activate natural killer cells (NK cells) and thereby increase our immune system. Under stress, your immunocompetence is reduced remarkably. NK cells are likely to lose their effects under stress. NK cells, which take responsibility for the immune system by killing defective cells, also have the ability to kill cancer cells.

Stress

Endorphins are anti-stress hormones: The ability to cope with the stress is in proportion to the endorphins levels we have in our body. We will encounter great difficulties in removing our stress unless sufficient amounts of endorphins are released.

Blood Pressure

The release of endorphins lowers the blood pressure, a major indicator in heart disease, and has even been implicated in the fight against cancer. During stress, people who secrete endorphins have lower heart rate reactivity.

Anger

Chronic anger can have serious consequences on our health , resulting in hypertension, increased cholesterol levels, damaged or blocked arteries, aggravated heart disease, increased susceptibility to infection ( due to depressed immune system), and longer recovery time from major traumas to the body. When acted out, anger can result in physical violence inflicted on others, and when internalized inwards, anger can result in depression, and may lead to unhealthy coping mechanisms, such as alcohol or substance misuse.

Depression

Endorphins play an important role in reducing depression According to the Mayo Clinic, endorphins, nature’s free gift to us, is one way to alleviate depression Dr. Laskowski, with the Mayo Clinic says that, “Endorphins are the body’s natural pain reliever.” And while endorphins are known for their ability to reduce physical pain, sometimes as effective as a dose of morphine, many people do not realize that they also play a key role in reducing anxiety and depression too.

Sleep

The increase in norepinephrine causes adrenaline to be released and the reduction of serotonin makes sleep difficult to impossible. It is important to note that serotonin is a sleep enabling Neuro-transmitter, not a sleep inducing one. A lack of serotonin makes sleep very hard to achieve. Once the serotonin becomes available, the body demands the sleep it now badly needs. As levels are restored, you notice that you sleep better, think more clearly, are slower to anger, feel more at peace and relaxed. You find you’re more positive, focused and motivated. These feelings begin to replace negative thoughts, hopelessness and depression.

“CES is known to increase levels of the brain Neuro-transmitters norepinephrine and dopamine, both associated with alertness and feelings of pleasure. Interestingly, serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine are the same Neuro-transmitters that most antidepressant medications attempt to activate.”

Cranial electrical stimulation (CES) devices are thought to raise alpha waves, raise blood levels of endorphins and increase conversion of amino acids into the brain’s Neuro-transmitters.

Do you know that microcurrent can tighten your skin?

Microcurrent, a popular treatment for aging skin, uses low level electrical current to trigger the body’s natural skin enhancement chemicals at a cellular level, giving skin therapists an effective tool against the signs of skin aging. While alternative medicine practitioners use it for injury recovery, skin therapists note that it provides firming and toning benefits that continue to improve with subsequent treatments.

microcurrent-for-skin

Microcurrent can be performed to achieve the following benefits:

  • Improve muscle tone in the face and neck
  • Lift jowels and eyebrows
  • Reduce and eliminate fine lines and wrinkles
  • Improve facial circulation
  • Aid in lymphatic drainage
  • Enhance product penetration to treat multiple skin problems

Some clinical studies have shown that after twenty days of Microcurrent treatments, collagen and elastin production increases and blood circulation improves. Scientists have also found that Microcurrent facelift treatments trigger the body’s production of amino acids and Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP). Both of these accelerate cell repair and promote healthier cell production.

Ref.: http://www.dermalinstitute.com

Quantity and quality of sleep may act as fountain of youth in old age

“Why do some people age more ‘successfully’ than others?” UC Berkeley researchers think sleep is one of the factors.

As people get older, they sleep less and wake up more frequently. But does that mean older people just need less sleep?

Not according to UC Berkeley researchers, who argue in an article published April 5, 2017 in the journal Neuron that the unmet sleep needs of the elderly elevate their risk of memory loss and a wide range of mental and physical disorders.

The review suggests aging adults may be losing their ability to produce deep, restorative sleep. Furthermore, older people are likely paying for lost sleep both mentally and physically, the reviewers argue.

sleep-for-older-people

“Sleep changes with aging, but it doesn’t just change with aging; it can also start to explain aging itself,” says review co-author Matthew Walker, who leads the Sleep and Neuroimaging Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. “Every one of the major diseases that are killing us in first-world nations—from diabetes to obesity to Alzheimer’s disease to cancer—all of those things now have strong causal links to a lack of sleep. And all of those diseases significantly increase in likelihood the older that we get, and especially in dementia.”

Older adults’ sleep loss isn’t due to a busy schedule or simply needing less sleep. As the brain ages, neurons and circuits in the areas that regulate sleep slowly degrade, resulting in a decreased amount of non-REM sleep. Since non-REM deep sleep plays a key role in maintaining memory and cognition, that’s a problem. “There is a debate in the literature as to whether older adults need less sleep, or rather, older adults cannot generate the sleep that they nevertheless need. We discuss this debate at length in the review,” says Walker. “The evidence seems to favor one side—older adults do not have a reduced sleep need, but instead, an impaired ability to generate sleep. The elderly therefore suffer from an unmet sleep need.”

This problem has long flown under the radar in sleep research. Older adults rarely report feeling sleepy or sleep-deprived on surveys but that may be because their brains are accustomed to being sleep-deprived every day. When researchers look for chemical markers of sleep deprivation, older adults have them in spades, and when researchers measure the brain waves of older adults, they often find that key electrical patterns in sleeping brains—such as “slow waves” and “sleep spindles”—are disrupted.

Perhaps even more distressingly, the changes in sleep quality start well before people notice that they are shifting to a more “early-to-bed-early-to-rise” schedule or are waking up in the middle of the night more often. The loss of deep sleep starts as early as the mid-thirties. “It’s particularly dramatic in early middle age when it starts to begin,” says Mander. “The difference between young adults and middle aged adults is bigger than the difference between middle aged adults and older adults. So there seems to be a pretty big change in middle age, which then continues as we get older.”

Another surprising finding the authors address is the resilience of REM sleep to the process of aging—rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, where dreams occur. “It does decline, but it is nowhere near as dramatic as the decline in deep non-REM sleep,” says Walker. “So the question then becomes: why is deep non-REM sleep more vulnerable?”

The authors stress that there is variability between individuals when it comes to sleep loss. Women seem to experience far less deterioration in non-REM deep sleep than men, even though the changes to REM sleep are about the same in those two genders. (Aging-related sleep loss hasn’t been studied in trans and nonbinary people yet.) Faster-than-average sleep deterioration may also be a key risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and dementia.

If older people are sleeping a little less than they used to — or wake up once at night then quickly fall back asleep — that’s probably not a red flag. But older adults should talk to their doctor if they routinely sleep less than six hours a night, or lack long “consolidated” blocks of sleep. “We need to recognize the causal contribution of sleep disruption in the physical and mental deterioration that underlies aging and dementia. More attention needs to be paid to the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disturbance if we are going to extend healthspan, and not just lifespan.”

The hunt for new treatments

Meanwhile, non-pharmaceutical interventions are being explored to boost the quality of sleep, such as electrical stimulation to amplify brain waves during sleep and acoustic tones that act like a metronome to slow brain rhythms.

However, promoting alternatives to prescription and over-the-counter sleep aids is sure to be challenging.

“The American College of Physicians has acknowledged that sleeping pills should not be the first-line kneejerk response to sleep problems,” Walker said. “Sleeping pills sedate the brain, rather than help it sleep naturally. We must find better treatments for restoring healthy sleep in older adults, and that is now one of our dedicated research missions.”

But people should not wait until old age to care about sleep. People often start losing the capacity for deep sleep in middle age, and that decline continues over the years. In some cases sleep apnea may be to blame. In other cases, people may need lifestyle adjustments that can improve their sleep. The good news is that “behavioral and environmental changes are powerful.” People can improve their sleep by fitting physical and social activity into their daily routine. At night they make sure the bedroom temperature is comfortable and limit exposure to artificial light — especially the blue glow of computer and TV screens. It’s important to have enough daylight, in the morning and afternoon: That helps keep the body’s circadian rhythms (the sleep-wake cycle) on track.

Also important to consider in changing the culture of sleep is the question of quantity versus quality.

“Previously, the conversation has focused on how many hours you need to sleep,” Mander said. “However, you can sleep for a sufficient number of hours, but not obtain the right quality of sleep. We also need to appreciate the importance of sleep quality.

“Indeed, we need both quantity and quality”

REF> news.berkeley.edu, medicalxpress.com/news

Cranial Electrotherapy to enhance an aging brain

There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that the aging brain undergoes neuroplastic changes to respond to functional declines and keep performance on the best level. During these changes, additional brain areas are recruited, such as the ipsilateral motor cortex.

First proof of principle has been provided that CES might modulate cortical functions even in old subjects. Nevertheless, this exciting and progressing field is still at a starting point and more studies are needed to further substantiate the hypothesis that CES can be used to enhance functions that have declined with age. In comparison to pharmacological interventions, CES is applied focally and does not have systemic side effects, a crucial point to consider in this population. Moreover, these techniques are easy to apply and can be coupled with training protocols or rehabilitative programs, such as physio-, occupational, speech therapy, or gait training to enhance impaired functions with a consecutive improvement of quality of life.

cesultra-old-people

Morphological changes of the aging brain

During healthy aging, the brain experiences complex structural and biochemical changes, including modification in dendritic morphology, synaptic connectivity (Anderson and Rutledge, 1996), Ca2+ dysregulation (Toescu et al., 2004), gene expression (for review see Burke and Barnes, 2006) and a decrease in the availability and level of neurotransmitters (Roth and Joseph, 1994). Cholinergic and dopaminergic reductions are particularly pronounced compromising motor, attention, and memory processes (Volkow et al., 1998; Braver and Barch, 2002). Furthermore, extensive studies reported that the function of the dopaminergic system gradually declines as we grow older due to degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and receptors (Zaman et al., 2008).

Age-related decreases in white matter integrity appear to be a common process in the brain (Resnick et al., 2003; Stadlbauer et al., 2008). Recent morphological studies using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, for review see Pierpaoli et al., 1996) in old healthy subjects have consistently shown a correlation between aging and reduction of fractional anisotropy, suggesting a rarefaction of directionally oriented axonal membranes, and increased mean diffusivity reflecting an alteration in cellular membranes and other structures hindering diffusion (Sullivan and Pfefferbaum, 2006).

These age-related differences in white matter integrity are seen throughout the brain, with an increasing magnitude of the difference in anterior white matter structures compared to posterior regions, which most authors refer to as a “anterior–posterior gradient,” with age-related changes occurring earlier in the frontal lobe (Bennett et al., 2010). The corpus callosum represents the largest white matter structure connecting the two hemispheres in the brain. Age-related changes in the topology of the corpus callosum primarily affect the genus; however, recent studies using more sensitive techniques of DTI also demonstrated changes in the splenium (Bastin et al., 2010).

Until now, there is no consensus of the etiology and the functional repercussion of these changes in white matter structure, but recent data from healthy individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairments and dementia converge on highlighting correlations between cognitive performance and fractional anisotropy (Persson et al., 2006), indicating that the decline in white matter might be associated with cognitive impairment.

CES vs. Drugs in the aging population

cesultra-for-old-people

As in many developed countries, we are an aging population. The treatment of depression, anxiety and insomnia in the geriatric patients with medications present unique challenges due to the increased risk of adverse side effects. These side effects include the risk of falls and motor vehicle accidents. Again, the number of medications taken in our geriatric patients continues to increase. Thus risk of adding psychotropic medications to their medication profile poses additional drug/drug interactions and side effect burden. CES avoids this disadvantage and provides a safe alternative to patients, their families and care givers. Furthermore, missing a CES treatment does not carry the risks of missing doses of psychotropic medications in this population.

Excerpts from “A View from the Trenches” written by Jason Worchel, M.D.

More CES Research – http://www.cesultra.com/research-resources.htm