Category Archives: Alternative Health

CES Ultra is a drug-free treatment

Brain Stimulation Therapies for Mental Health

Alternatives to Drugs in the Treatment of Depression

It’s estimated that around 30 percent of people with depression don’t respond to typical antidepressants. This is known as treatment-resistant depression. An important alternative which can be life-changing is brain stimulation therapy.

brain-stimulation-for-mental-health

Brain stimulation therapy involves the application of [electric] energy over specific brain regions to modulate the function of neural circuits. This can help alleviate symptoms of depression or other mental illnesses that aren’t responding to typical treatments, such as bipolar disorder. There are five main types of brain stimulation therapies used to treat mental illness: electroconvulsive therapy, vagus nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic seizure therapy. Let’s explore vagus nerve stimulation(VNS) and Deep brain stimulation (DBS).

Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS)

Vagus nerve stimulation was initially developed as a treatment for the seizure disorder epilepsy, and in a happy accident, scientists discovered that it could help with depression as well. The FDA approved VNS for treatment-resistant depression in 2005.

If you’re getting this kind of therapy, doctors will surgically implant a tool called a pulse generator into the upper left portion of your chest. An electrical wire connects the pulse generator to your vagus nerve, which runs from your brain through your neck and into your chest and abdomen. From its command center in your chest, the pulse generator will send bursts of electric currents to your brain every couple of minutes. Pulse generators typically work for around 10 years before they need to be replaced.

It appears as though VNS can improve issues like severe depression by changing levels of neurotransmitters in your brain including serotonin, norepinephrine, GABA, and glutamate. A 2018 study published in The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry analyzed quality of life reports from 599 people with treatment-resistant depression, finding that those who combined VNS with other antidepressant treatments experienced significant improvements in their quality of life, even if their symptoms didn’t disappear completely. That points to an important fact about VNS: anyone receiving it will need to continue their other treatments (like taking antidepressants). Even so, it can take months to see a difference when using VNS, and the device could shift or malfunction, which may require more surgery.

VNS is not a surefire fix. Some people’s conditions get worse after they try it, not better.

Deep brain stimulation (DBS)

This started as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease, according to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. Then doctors realized it shows promise for easing depression and obsessive compulsive disorder, too. FDA approved deep brain stimulation for obsessive compulsive disorder, but not yet for depression.

Like VNS, deep brain stimulation uses pulse generators in the chest to send electrical pulses to the brain. Unlike VNS, which delivers stimulation in bursts, DBS involves more continuous stimulation but you should be able to customize the exact frequency with your doctor’s help.

The Problem: Both Deep brain stimulation and Vagus nerve stimulation describe costly and intrusive procedure involving an implant.

The Solution:

There is another non –intrusive, non-invasive and  way to target the vague nerve: cranial electrotherapy stimulation using CES devices. CES devices can achieve good result at fraction of the cost; and there is no need for an implant.CES therapy is simple and easy. Pre-gelled electrodes are placed in such a manner as to directly The compact size and ear clip electrodes makes it easy to use just about anywhere and under a variety of circumstances. You can your portable CES unit  at home while watching TV, doing the dishes, walking, studying, at the office while poring over a report, etc. You can do so safely, with no serious negative side-effects and at a fraction of the cost and none of the risks of a major operation.

re: > https://www.self.com/story/brain-stimulation-therapies

Do You Need a brain implant?

brain-implant-cesultra

How far would you go to keep your mind from failing? Would you go so far as to let a doctor drill a hole in your skull and stick a microchip in your brain?

It’s not an idle question. In recent years neuroscientists have made major advances in cracking the code of memory, figuring out exactly how the human brain stores information and learning to reverse-engineer the process. Now they’ve reached the stage where they’re starting to put all of that theory into practice.

Last month two research teams reported success at using electrical signals, carried into the brain via implanted wires, to boost memory in small groups of test patients. “It’s a major milestone in demonstrating the ability to restore memory function in humans,” says Dr. Robert Hampson, a neuroscientist at Wake Forest School of Medicine and the leader of one of the teams.
The research is funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which sees brain implants as a life-changing technology for the 270,000 American soldiers who have suffered a traumatic brain injury in combat. The possible applications go much further, however. Brain implants could also change the lives of millions of Americans battling Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders, or even help stave off the mental decline that we all confront as we get older.

Interested? But why go through a highly invasive and dangerous procedure? Why needlessly spend thousands of dollars to do so? Not when there’s a safe, non-invasive alternative—with no negative side effects, at a fraction of the cost. Plant seeds in your garden, not devices in your brain. Learn how the CES Ultra can help you.

Vagus Nerve Stimulation and Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis

A completely new method of treating rheumatoid arthritis that does not involve drugs may be on the horizon.

In 2016, a team of researchers from several countries, including the U.S., reported that stimulating the vagus nerve with an electrical pulse appeared to inhibit the production of some of the inflammation-promoting proteins – called cytokines – commonly seen in people with RA.

The vagus nerve is located on both the left and right sides of the body and runs from the brainstem through the neck into the chest and abdomen. One of the longest of all the cranial nerves, the vagus nerve serves several important functions. It regulates the heartbeat, breathing and sweating. It helps keep the larynx open during breathing and enables us to speak. It also connects to the stomach and gut, telling the brain when we’ve ingested food, then signaling that it’s been digested and triggering the brain to empty the digested food from the stomach into the intestines. It also controls bowel movements.

Vagus nerve stimulation is most often used to treat epilepsy that does not respond to drug therapy. It is also used as a means of treating severe depression that has not responded to treatment with antidepressant medications, and it is increasingly being tried as a potential treatment for other conditions, including multiple sclerosis, pain, headache, Alzheimer’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease and RA.

The study, headed by physicians at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, involved implanting a small medical device similar to a cardiac pacemaker under the skin in the chest wall and connecting wires from the device to the vagus nerve in the neck. The device, which is really a small electrical generator, was programmed to deliver small electrical pulses to stimulate the nerve up to four times each day.

vague nerve stimulation

They describe costly and intrusive procedure involving an implant. CES, specifically Ces Ultra, can achieve the same result at fraction of the cost and in noninvasive manner. The CES Ultra does not make claims as to alleviation of pain. However this article shows how inflammation and symptoms of arthritis maybe reduce by vagus nerve stimulation. The CES Ultra targets the vagus nerve.

Antidepressants and Non-drug Alternatives

A few years ago, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) looked at antidepressant use in 25 countries and found something startling. In every single country the OECD looked at, antidepressant use was on the rise.

In Germany, antidepressant use had risen 46% in just four years. In Spain and Portugal, it rose about 20% during the same period. Iceland led the pack in overall use with about one in ten people taking a daily antidepressant — but that figure may underestimate the actual rate of use, since that calculation isn’t restricted to just adults.

The United States was not included in the OECD analysis (we’ve added it to the chart below), but if it had been, it would knock Iceland out of the top spot: 11% of Americans over the age of 12 take an antidepressant.

antidepressant chart

Antidepressant use is not an accurate window into rates of depression. Instead, the popularity of antidepressants in a given country is the result of a complicated mix of depression rates, stigma, wealth, health coverage, and availability of treatment.

The OECD suggests two possible reasons the rate of antidepressant consumption is on the rise in so many countries. The course of treatment lasts longer than it used to, and antidepressants are now prescribed not only for severe depression, but also for mild depression, anxiety, social phobia, and more.

Among Americans, 60% of people taking antidepressants have been taking them for at least two years; 14% have taken them for 10 years or more.

Central-nervous-system agents today constitute the fastest growing sector of the pharmaceutical market, accounting for 31% of total sales in the United States.

This trend is fraught with danger. Some people take the wrong medication; others get an old or contaminated batch, some a counterfeit; others take them in dangerous combinations with other prescriptions. Some drugs are addictive, others have devastating emotional and physical side effects. Every year a million people—3 to 5% of all hospital admissions—are admitted primarily because of a negative reaction to medications. The situation has become especially exacerbated by the medical profession’s propensity to dole out medication like candy for the slightest sign of depression, anxiety, or insomnia, helping make drugs like Prozac, Buspar, and Paxil as chic in the suburbs as crack is in the inner city. This has led to a virtual plague of legal drug addiction.

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) is a safe and effective alternative for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and insomnia. CES is the anti-drug—the non-pharmacological alternative—a unique and viable bio-electric approach which enhances the homeostasis of the biological central nervous system—the tendency for intrinsic balance within a system. User-friendly, it employs mild battery-powered electrical stimulation through clip-on electrodes attached to the earlobes or pre-gelled electrodes placed behind the ears. Current flow is limited so that the most the patient experiences during the process is nothing more than a slight tingling sensation. There are virtually no negative side effects. Gently adding energy back to all parts of the brain, CES helps return the user to the optimum state in effect before stressors were activated.

CES impacts most directly by reducing anxiety. This is often experienced in the course of treatment; for others, hours, or several days after. CES leaves the patient feeling both relaxed and alert. The effect differs from pharmaceutical treatments in that people report their body as feeling lighter and more relaxed and their mind, more alert and clear. Results are cumulative and lasting. For those suffering from depression and anxiety, CES means relief with none of the unpleasant side effects of prescription drugs. For those seeking nothing more than a good night’s sleep, it is an alternative to habit-forming tranquilizers. For a public increasingly concerned with the effects of stress on physical health and emotional well being, CES provides a way of addressing that stress in a safe and effective manner.

CES is a treatment modality with an ethic – that of self-regulation. Its goal, wellness—a state of proper alignment—the balanced interplay of body and mind attained through personal empowerment rather than dependency. The CES ethic believes that increased reliance on external drugs interferes with that self-regulatory process, reducing our ability to cope. That to reclaim control of our lives we have to learn how to alter that chemical composition and reorient that circuitry, not through dependency but by activating, strengthening, and effectively employing our own inner resources. CES—a treatment modality whose time has come.

Reasearch: Cranial Electrotherapy for Seizure Patients

Research attention turned to patients with acquired closed head injuries, resulting from such things as motorcycle accidents, falls from high elevations on construction projects, inoperable brain tumors, etc. That group drew special attention because the majority of them were known seizure patients and little was known of the effects of Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) on seizure patients. Under the supervision of a research physician, 21 closed head injured patients living in a supervised care home were selected for a double-blind study.

ces-helps-seizure-patients

It was found that the cognitive function score improved significantly in the treatment group, as measured on the POMS. Following the study, the 11 patients in the two control groups (sham treatment, and wait-in-line control for any placebo effect in the sham group) were also given CES for three weeks.

During the study one of the subjects who had a cerebral malignancy had a seizure and was immediately removed from the study by the study physician. Later it was found that he had received sham treatment. Upon the insistence of his parents, he also received actual CES treatment for three weeks following the study and neither he nor any of the other CES treated patients experienced a seizure.

Years before in the District of Columbia, when alcoholic patients returned to the Center for additional treatment, if they had a history of withdrawal seizures, policy mandated that they not be given CES while in the program. Later it was learned that a major addiction treatment center in New Orleans that was associated with a local university, specifically ordered CES for the treatment of those patients during withdrawal to prevent seizures. They stated that they had successfully used CES as a preventive for withdrawal seizures for several years, with 100% success in more than 300 patients.

A pilot study for a large, double-blind study of the treatment of seizure patients with CES is underway. It can be stated that there has been no seizure activity reported to the FDA as a negative side effect from CES treatment over the last 30 plus years.

References:

Smith, R.B., A. Tiberi, and J. Marshall, (1994). The use of cranial electrotherapy stimulation in the treatment of closed-head-injured patients. Brain Injury

Rosenthal, Robert. Meta-analytic Procedures for Social Research. (Newbury Park:Sage Publications, 1991).