Monthly Archives: August 2016

CES vs. Drugs in the aging population

cesultra-for-old-people

As in many developed countries, we are an aging population. The treatment of depression, anxiety and insomnia in the geriatric patients with medications present unique challenges due to the increased risk of adverse side effects. These side effects include the risk of falls and motor vehicle accidents. Again, the number of medications taken in our geriatric patients continues to increase. Thus risk of adding psychotropic medications to their medication profile poses additional drug/drug interactions and side effect burden. CES avoids this disadvantage and provides a safe alternative to patients, their families and care givers. Furthermore, missing a CES treatment does not carry the risks of missing doses of psychotropic medications in this population.

Excerpts from “A View from the Trenches” written by Jason Worchel, M.D.

More CES Research – http://www.cesultra.com/research-resources.htm

One more reason to get a good night’s sleep

Sleep. It’s something we spend about a third of our lives doing, but do any of us really understand what it’s all about?

Two thousand years ago, Galen, one of the most prominent medical researchers of the ancient world, proposed that while we’re awake, our brain’s motive force, its juice, would flow out to all the other parts of the body, animating them but leaving the brain all dried up, and he thought that when we sleep, all this moisture that filled the rest of the body would come rushing back, rehydrating the brain and refreshing the mind. Now, that sounds completely ridiculous to us now, but Galen was simply trying to explain something about sleep that we all deal with every day. See, we all know based on our own experience that when you sleep, it clears your mind, and when you don’t sleep, it leaves your mind murky. But while we know a great deal more about sleep now than when Galen was around, we still haven’t understood why it is that sleep, of all of our activities, has this incredible restorative function for the mind.

We’ve found that sleep may actually be a kind of elegant design solution to some of the brain’s most basic needs, a unique way that the brain meets the high demands and the narrow margins that set it apart from all the other organs of the body.

So almost all the biology that we observe can be thought of as a series of problems and their corresponding solutions, and the first problem that every organ must solve is a continuous supply of nutrients to fuel all those cells of the body. In the brain, that is especially critical; its intense electrical activity uses up a quarter of the body’s entire energy supply, even though the brain accounts for only about two percent of the body’s mass. So the circulatory system solves the nutrient delivery problem by sending blood vessels to supply nutrients and oxygen to every corner of our body.

The blood vessels form a complex network that fills the entire brain volume. They start at the surface of the brain, and then they dive down into the tissue itself, and as they spread out, they supply nutrients and oxygen to each and every cell in the brain.

Now, just as every cell requires nutrients to fuel it, every cell also produces waste as a byproduct, and the clearance of that waste is the second basic problem that each organ has to solve. This diagram shows the body’s lymphatic system, which has evolved to meet this need. It’s a second parallel network of vessels that extends throughout the body. It takes up proteins and other waste from the spaces between the cells, it collects them, and then dumps them into the blood so they can be disposed of.

So how, then, does the brain solve its waste clearance problem? Well, that seemingly mundane question is where our group first jumped into this story, and what we found as we dove down into the brain, down among the neurons and the blood vessels, was that the brain’s solution to the problem of waste clearance, it was really unexpected. It was ingenious, but it was also beautiful. Let me tell you about what we found.

The brain has this large pool of clean, clear fluid called cerebrospinal fluid. We call it the CSF. The CSF fills the space that surrounds the brain, and wastes from inside the brain make their way out to the CSF, which gets dumped, along with the waste, into the blood. So in that way, it sounds a lot like the lymphatic system, doesn’t it? But what’s interesting is that the fluid and the waste from inside the brain, they don’t just percolate their way randomly out to these pools of CSF.

Instead, there is a specialized network of plumbing that organizes and facilitates this process. You can see that in these videos. Here, we’re again imaging into the brain of living mice. The frame on your left shows what’s happening at the brain’s surface, and the frame on your right shows what’s happening down below the surface of the brain within the tissue itself. We’ve labeled the blood vessels in red, and the CSF that’s surrounding the brain will be in green. Now, what was surprising to us was that the fluid on the outside of the brain, it didn’t stay on the outside. Instead, the CSF was pumped back into and through the brain along the outsides of the blood vessels, and as it flushed down into the brain along the outsides of these vessels, it was actually helping to clear away, to clean the waste from the spaces between the brain’s cells. If you think about it, using the outsides of these blood vessels like this is a really clever design solution, because the brain is enclosed in a rigid skull and it’s packed full of cells, so there is no extra space inside it for a whole second set of vessels like the lymphatic system. Yet the blood vessels, they extend from the surface of the brain down to reach every single cell in the brain, which means that fluid that’s traveling along the outsides of these vessels can gain easy access to the entire brain’s volume, so it’s actually this really clever way to repurpose one set of vessels, the blood vessels, to take over and replace the function of a second set of vessels, the lymphatic vessels, to make it so you don’t need them. And what’s amazing is that no other organ takes quite this approach to clearing away the waste from between its cells. This is a solution that is entirely unique to the brain. …. From ted.com

Watch more videos – www.youtube.com/cesultra
CES Ultra: The best way to help you get the sleep you need : Effective, safe, and drug-free.
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Operation Pro-Vet

The Problem

Tens of thousands of Iraqi and Afghan veterans have returned home from the wars with a debilitating condition: post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The VA is at loose ends about how to deal with a mental health crisis that is ruining not only the lives of returning vets, but those of their families and friends as well. Drug therapy, which is the main way they have treated the problem, has proven to be not only ineffective, but has worsened the situation, triggering an extraordinary spike in substance abuse, leading to violent behaviors and suicide.

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Read Brig. General (Ret) Stephen Xenakis MD, on the plight of our veterans at Huffingtonpost

Watch General Xenakis on Fox News, discussing how CES can help treat PTSD at FoxNews

An Answer?

Fortunately, there is a nondrug option with a proven track record in treating anxiety, depression, and insomnia which are the primary symptoms of PTSD. It’s called cranial electrotherapy stimulation, or CES. It’s an electronic device that is simple to use, has no side effects, and has been validated by decades of research. CES is currently being prescribed for active duty personnel returning from the mid-east at the Warrior Combat Stress Reset Program at Ft. Hood, TX, at Ft. Campbell, KY, Ft. Joint Ft Lewis-McChord, WA, at the Bremerton WA Naval Hospital, as well as in combat conditions in Iraq and Afghanistan. It should not stop there.

Operation Pro-Vet: How You Can Help

CES units generally retail for $350-$995. Because they are not generally covered by health insurance, they are most often out of the reach of veterans most of whom have a limited income or who are currently unemployed. Neuro-Fitness LLC, the manufacturer of the CES Ultra—in recognition of those who have given so much for their country—will now make available its CES unit at wholesale cost to veterans, not only of our current wars but our past wars as well as to their families. We are also working with Service clubs to make available units at a special low cost so that they may then be distributed to veterans in need.

To learn more about CES, visit us at our website: www.cesultra.com. To learn more about the program, call us at 1-866-937-4237 or email us today at sales@ cesultra.com for more information and how your local group or organization can become part of this program to assist those who have served on our behalf. They deserve nothing less.

Fears of dentists cured by Cranial Electrotherapy

Experts believe electrotherapy is the key to solving anxiety related to the dentist. MILLIONS of people could be cured of their fear of dentist surgeries with the help of electrotherapy, new research has claimed

Tiny electrical currents into the brain could help solve people’s terrifying phobia of the dentist.

Experts said a handheld device which transmits cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) reduced anxiety among those with a long fear of dentists.

The study conducted in Nigeria for the Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences said the treatment is similar to the TENS machines used by pregnant women.

The device stimulates nerves for therapeutic purposes and is used by expectant mothers for pain relief.

The research scientists carried out tests on 40 adults scared of the dentist and divided them into four groups.

cranial-electrotherapy-for-dentist

One group were treated with CES, another had relaxation therapy, a third group had both treatments while a fourth had none.

Relaxation therapy involved patients spending 30 minutes with a specialist trainer who taught them exercises to help lower anxiety levels.

The CES worked just as well as the relaxation therapy after 45 minutes.

Whereas having both treatments had no extra benefits but all were far more effective then doing nothing to curb anxiety related to the dentist.

Read more – http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health

A View from the Trenches: Why Psychiatry needs CES – Part 1

Why Psychiatry needs CES
by Jason Worchel, M.D.

Jason Worchel, M.D. is a noted psychiatrist and Director of the Hilo Mental Health Center in Hilo, HI. The following posts are taken from a paper written by Dr. Worchel in his testimony before the F.D.A. concerning the effectiveness and safety of CES from the perspective of a practicing psychiatrist.

The Challenge of Psycho-Pharmacology

As a practicing psychiatrist, I am constantly struggling with balancing purported efficacy with known risks of somatic interventions. While currently approved interventions have demonstrated efficacy relative to placebo, the rate of improvement with placebo remains consistently above 30%.

With the increasing prevalence of polypharmacy, there is an increasing risk of adverse side effects for the statistical hope for improved outcomes as demonstrated in clinical trials conducted with select populations in controlled environments. In addition to evaluating the risk/benefits of various treatments, I know from multiple studies most patients are not adherent to the prescribed medication regimens and discontinue medications altogether within a relatively short period of time.

Though my goal is to treat the presenting illness or alleviate its symptoms, my primary duty to my patients is to “do no harm.” This typically results in an approach that follows a spectrum of interventions with initial treatments being those with the least risk of adverse side effects.

There is no risk conventional interventions that currently constitute the standard of care will be bypassed by using CES.

Experience

I have worked with primary care physicians in our federally qualified health clinics on the Big Island. They, like others across the country, are stymied and frustrated by the challenge of treating chronic pain.

In particular, they face patients with bona fide pain but who also have depression, anxiety, insomnia and substance abuse. With regards to treatment interventions, they are damned if the do and damned if the don’t treatment with various classes of analgesic medications, including narcotic medications.

They are particularly afraid of the increasing fatalities occurring with the use of narcotic analgesic medications in combination with benzodiazepines and antidepressant medications. They welcome alternatives to medications for those patients whose emotional distress intensifies their suffering and pain sensation. CES could provide a safe alternative for them that do not currently exist.

In summary, CES represents as safe intervention for conditions for which existing treatments, especially pharmacologic and invasive interventions pose significant risk for adverse side effects. It is especially beneficial in defined populations. These include those who refuse medications and psychotherapy, dual diagnosed patients, geriatric patients, females of child bearing age and during pregnancy.

Advantages of CES

I would like to highlight various advantages of CES relative to other existing treatments, especially medications that may not be well appreciated. Take for example, the difficulty faced by primary care physicians and mental health professionals in treating female patients of child bearing age. All available medications have teratogenic risk and are not recommended during pregnancy and breast feeding. Patients desiring to become pregnant have justified concerns about taking psychotropic medication

cesultra, ces ultra, cranial electrotherapy How To

Current treatment algorithms encourage polypharmacy when initial treatments with a single drug are not effective. While there is some increased response, polypharmacy only increases the side effects burden and can result in untoward drug/drug interactions. These types of problems do not occur with CES.

Many psychotropic medications for the treatments of depression, anxiety and insomnia have discontinuation syndromes. Given the high rate of discontinuation of these medications by patients due to side effects and lack of efficacy, many patients unfortunately suffer when the take a medication prescribed to alleviate their suffering. This does not occur with CES. There are circumstances, for example prior to surgery, when certain psychotropic medications are required to be discontinued. CES does not have to be discontinued prior to surgery.

One my greatest concerns in treating patients with depression, anxiety and insomnia involves suicide. We know increased risk of suicide in depressed patients but it is often global insomnia is a significant risk factor for suicide as well as anxiety/agitation. Although safer than the older tricyclic and tetracylcic antidepressants, the current medications carry a significant risk of death in overdose, especially when combined with other analgesic medications. Too often, the medications we prescribed to prevent suicide become a means through which the patient attempts suicide. In fact, there are black box warnings that these medications may increase suicidal impulses, especially in adolescents. CES does not pose this risk.

As in many developed countries, we are an aging population. The treatment of depression, anxiety and insomnia in the geriatric patients with medications present unique challenges due to the increased risk of adverse side effects. These side effects include the risk of falls and motor vehicle accidents. Again, the number of medications taken in our geriatric patients continues to increase. Thus risk of adding psychotropic medications to their other medications poses additional drug/drug interactions and side effect burden.

CES avoids this disadvantage and provides a safe alternative to patients, their families and care givers. Furthermore, missing a CES treatment does not carry the risks of missing doses of psychotropic medications in this population.

CES Ultra research – read more – http://www.cesultra.com/research-resources.htm