Tag Archives: cranial electrotherapy stimulation

Vagus Nerve Stimulation And Inflammation

Non-Invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulation Conceptual Representation
Non-Invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulation Conceptual Representation

Vagus Nerve Stimulation

Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a medical treatment that is routinely used in the treatment of epilepsy and other neurological conditions. VNS studies are not just clinically, but also scientifically informative regarding the role of the vagus nerve in health and disease.

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Device and Method

Non-Invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulator Attached to the Auricular Concha via Ear Clip
Non-Invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulator Attached to the Auricular Concha via Ear Clip

Vagus nerve stimulation works by applying electrical impulses to the vagus nerve. The stimulation of the vagus nerve can be performed in two different ways: a direct invasive stimulation, which is currently the most frequent application and an indirect transcutaneous non-invasive stimulation. Invasive VNS (iVNS) requires the surgical implantation of a small pulse generator subcutaneously in the left thoracic region. In contrast to iVNS, transcutaneous VNS (tVNS) allows for a non-invasive stimulation of the vagus nerve without any surgical procedure. Here, the stimulator is usually attached to the auricular concha via ear clips and delivers electrical impulses at the subcutaneous course of the afferent auricular branch of the vagus nerve (2).

A pilot study that examined the application of VNS in 60 patients with treatment-resistant depressive disorder showed a significant clinical improvement in 30–37% of patients and a high tolerability (3). Five years later, the stimulation of the vagus nerve for the treatment of refractory depression was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (4). Since then, the safety and efficacy of VNS in depression has been demonstrated in numerous observational studies as can be seen below. In contrast, there is no randomized, placebo-control clinical trial that reliably demonstrates antidepressant effects of VNS.

The vagus nerve represents the main component of the parasympathetic nervous system, which oversees a vast array of crucial bodily functions, including control of mood, immune response, digestion, and heart rate. It establishes one of the connections between the brain and the gastrointestinal tract and sends information about the state of the inner organs to the brain via afferent fibers. In this review article, we discuss various functions of the vagus nerve which make it an attractive target in treating psychiatric and gastrointestinal disorders. There is preliminary evidence that vagus nerve stimulation is a promising add-on treatment for treatment-refractory depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and inflammatory bowel disease. Treatments that target the vagus nerve increase the vagal tone and inhibit cytokine production. Both are important mechanism of resiliency. The stimulation of vagal afferent fibers in the gut influences monoaminergic brain systems in the brain stem that play crucial roles in major psychiatric conditions, such as mood and anxiety disorders. In line, there is preliminary evidence for gut bacteria to have beneficial effect on mood and anxiety, partly by affecting the activity of the vagus nerve. Since, the vagal tone is correlated with capacity to regulate stress responses and can be influenced by breathing, its increase through meditation and yoga likely contribute to resilience and the mitigation of mood and anxiety symptoms.

VNS In Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Vagus nerve stimulation attenuates the systemic inflammatory response to endotoxin (5) and intestinal inflammation (6). The VNs also indirectly modulates immune activity of the spleen through connections with the splenic sympathetic nerve (7). In rats with colonic inflammation, the 3-hour long daily VNS for a period of 5 days led to a reduction in inflammatory markers and an improvement in symptoms of colitis (8).

Vagus nerve stimulation should be of interest in other inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, another TNF-α-mediated disease. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a study that demonstrated an improvement of symptoms in the early and late stages of the disease through 1–4 minutes of VNS daily (9). This study was also the first to show that VNS inhibits the production of TNF-α (also known as TNF-alpha) and other cytokines in humans by stimulating the inflammatory reflex, leading to an improvement of symptom severity. These data argue for an anti-inflammatory role of the vagus nerve and provide potential therapeutic applications for patients with IBDs (10, 8, 11).

Conclusion

The interaction between the gut and the brain is based on a complex system that includes not only neural but also endocrine, immune, and humoral links.

The vagus nerve is an essential part of the brain–gut axis and plays an important role in the modulation of inflammation, the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, and the regulation of food intake, satiety, and energy homeostasis. An interaction between nutrition and the vagus nerve is well known, and vagal tone can influence food intake and weight gain.

Moreover, the vagus nerve plays an important role in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, obesity as well as other stress-induced and inflammatory diseases.

Vagus nerve stimulation and several meditation techniques demonstrate that modulating the vagus nerve has a therapeutic effect, mainly due to its relaxing and anti-inflammatory properties.

Extinction paired with VNS is more rapid than extinction paired with sham stimulation. As it is currently approved by the Federal FDA for depression and seizure prevention, VNS is a readily available and promising adjunct to exposure therapy for the treatment of severe anxiety disorders.

Vagus nerve stimulation is an effective anticonvulsant device and has shown in observational studies antidepressant effects in chronic treatment-resistant depression. Because the vagus nerve sends information to brain regions is important in the stress response (LC, orbitofrontal cortex, insula, hippocampus, and amygdala), this pathway might be involved in perceiving or manifesting various somatic and cognitive symptoms that characterize stress-related disorders.

Psychotropic drugs, such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, have effects on both the brain and the gastrointestinal tract and consequently should be understood as modulators of the brain–gut axis.

Research investigating the interaction between nutritive factors, somatic factors, such as heart rate, psychological and pharmacological treatments, and vagal activity has the potential to lead to integrative treatment options that incorporate VNS, nutritional approaches, drugs, and psychological interventions, such as mindfulness-based approaches, which can be tailored to the needs of the individual patient.

A Final Thought About Vagus Nerve Stimulation And CES

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) has been engaging Vagus nerve stimulation for decades, through the use of ear clips to stimulate the nerve endings in the ears. Recent data from clinical studies and practical application reflect the positive results that may be gained by applying low amplitude, extremely low frequency (ELF) electric currents, through the Vagus nerve system. The CES Ultra cranial electrotherapy stimulator device incorporates both ELF and ear clip attachments, as part of its standard application to treat anxiety, depression, and insomnia without medication.

Get Your Own CES Ultra for only $249

Citations

  1. Frontiers in Psychiatry – Vagus Nerve as Modulator of the Brain–Gut Axis in Psychiatric and Inflammatory Disorders (original publication)
  2. National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine – Effect of transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation on major depressive disorder: A nonrandomized controlled pilot study
  3. Springer Nature – Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS™) for Treatment-Resistant Depression: Efficacy, Side Effects, and Predictors of Outcome
  4. ScienceDirect® – Safety and efficacy of Vagus Nerve Stimulation in treatment-resistant depression. A systematic review
  5. Springer Nature – Vagus nerve stimulation attenuates the systemic inflammatory response to endotoxin
  6. Springer Nature – Stimulation of the vagus nerve attenuates macrophage activation by activating the Jak2-STAT3 signaling pathway
  7. American Association for the Advancement of Science – Acetylcholine-Synthesizing T Cells Relay Neural Signals in a Vagus Nerve Circuit
  8. ScienceDirect – Anti-inflammatory effect of vagus nerve stimulation in a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease
  9. PNAS – Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cytokine production and attenuates disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis
  10. The Physiological Society – Anti‐inflammatory properties of the vagus nerve: potential therapeutic implications of vagus nerve stimulation
  11. Clinical Medicine Insights: Gastroenterology – Bioelectrical Stimulation for the Reduction of Inflammation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  12. CES Ultra – The Role of CES in Fighting Inflammation
  13. CES Ultra – Non-Drug Relief From Anxiety.

Last Modified: October 17, 2019

Coping with Winter Depression

Depression is a chemical habit of the brain. Everyone’s neurochemistry (NC) is slightly different, but everyone is addicted to their own NC. If your NC is that of a depressed person, you need to reverse it. Your brain needs to learn how to go back where it was and start making the NC it used to make. With CES, your brain will remember how to make what it needs. Once your brain’s receptors start calling for the rebalanced levels, you’ll return what was normal for you in the past. Your depression will ebb away.

Winter depression is not a myth

winter-depression-cesultra

Despite the fact that millions of us say we’ve suffered a winter-related low mood, it can feel as though the winter blues is just a myth. But there’s sound scientific evidence to support the idea that the season can affect our moods.

Most scientists believe that the problem is related to the way the body responds to daylight. Alison Kerry, from the mental health charity MIND, says: “With SAD, one theory is that light entering the eye causes changes in hormone levels in the body. In our bodies, light functions to stop the production of the sleep hormone melatonin, making us wake up.

“It’s thought that SAD sufferers are affected by shorter daylight hours in the winter. They produce higher melatonin, causing lethargy and symptoms of depression.”

If you’re going through a bout of winter blues, lack of daylight is probably playing a part.

Long-term depression happens over a period of time, but now you can get your brain to work for you again. The CES Ultra, using Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES), can bring you true relief. It’s a proven way to treat feelings of depression—without using drugs. Studies show that approximately 70% of people with depression who use the CES Ultra find relief of their symptoms.

Focus Factor Side Effects

Focus Factor® bottle, not equal to symbol, fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts
Focus Factor® bottle, not equal to symbol, fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts

Focus Factor is a memory booster that provides supplemental nutrition to help you feel sharper and more alert.

The ingredients of Focus Factor are vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, biotin, pantothenic acid, calcium, iron, iodine, magnesium, zinc, selenium, copper, manganese, chromium, molybdenum, potassium, diemethylaminoethanol, L glutamine, bacopin, L-pyroglutamic acid, phosphatidylsering, docosahexanoic acid concentrate, choline, inositol, N acetyltyrosine, bilberry fruit, GABA, Activin, vinpocetine, trace lyte, huperzine A, boron, vanadium and grape skin extract. According to the official website, Focus Factor is, America’s #1 brain health supplement.

The suggested use on the package lists Focus Factor as a dietary supplement. Recall how many vitamins it has. TOO MUCH OF ANY VITAMIN CAN CAUSE TOXICITY. Common signs of this condition include: A sudden fever, low blood pressure, HEADACHE, muscle aches, confusion, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting.

There are reports it causes headaches, as well as other side effects, when you read through the customer feedback posted online. Plus, there is no detail about the cited clinical study that supports its claims.

Before going for company-produced boosters, try what Mother Nature provides you. Balance in our diet is essential to balancing our systems.

Balance: Key To Optimal Health And Well-Being

Balance is the key to optimal health and well-being. Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) is one way to balance the neuro-chemical and hormonal processes of your physiology. CES is a non-invasive, non pharmaceutical way to achieve higher cognitive function, by using your body’s natural systems, without side effects. CES uses an extremely low frequency electrical current to coax or engage parts of the human system, responsible for rebalancing neuro-chemical and hormonal function. CES Ultra is a CES device, designed specifically for these purposes.

CES Ultra works by stimulating the limbic system and the Vagus nerve. This CES process is both safe and effective for treating insomnia, anxiety, depression, and the repercussion of lessened cognitive function, due to a debilitating nature:

  • The better we sleep the sharper our mental acuity
  • The less depressed we are the more our awareness remains in the moment
  • The less anxious we are the more pertinent information we can retain.

Learn more about the science behind CES and the CES Ultra device.

Get Your Own CES Ultra for only $249

Citations

Last Modified: October 17, 2019

CES being used in pain clinics

CES units were becoming more widely used in pain clinics at the dawning of the 21st century. The clinics typically do not wait for pain studies to be completed, but simply try CES with their patients to see what effect they can observe, then compare it with their historical experience with those same types of patients. A typical such clinic is one just outside Dallas, Texas. A nursing assistant puts CES electrodes on patients as they enter the waiting room to await their turn with physicians or other therapists. The wait can vary from a few minutes to a half hour, depending on the patient load at a given time. The patients complete a 10 point self rated pain score prior to receiving CES. When they are called into treatment by the treatment staff, the CES is removed, the amount of time they were on the device is recorded, as a post CES self rated pain score if obtained.

The clinic has become so enthusiastic about the results, that this protocol has become a permanent part of their core treatment program. They now enthusiastically prescribe CES home units for their large number of patients who now request them, and the staff reports their clinic is much more effectively treating chronic pain than they were previously.

Pain clinic treatment results have been published, however. An interesting CES study was completed in a pain clinic near Bombay, India, in 2001. It was an open clinical trial of CES, used alone as a treatment of pain patients who had been refractory to all other previous efforts of treatment of their pain at the clinic. They were given CES treatments one hour per day, 5 days a week, for three weeks. They were asked to rate their pain level on a VAS scale of 0 to 10, with 10 being the most intense pain. Following treatment their mean self reported pain level had been reduced by 62%. Analyzing the data for individual patients it was found that 15% of the patients did not respond to the treatment, 30% gained total relief, while the remainder of the patients claimed significant relief ranging from 33% to 94%.

Operation Pro-Vet

The Problem

Tens of thousands of Iraqi and Afghan veterans have returned home from the wars with a debilitating condition: post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The VA is at loose ends about how to deal with a mental health crisis that is ruining not only the lives of returning vets, but those of their families and friends as well. Drug therapy, which is the main way they have treated the problem, has proven to be not only ineffective, but has worsened the situation, triggering an extraordinary spike in substance abuse, leading to violent behaviors and suicide.

cranial-stimulation-prevent-suicide

Read Brig. General (Ret) Stephen Xenakis MD, on the plight of our veterans at Huffingtonpost

Watch General Xenakis on Fox News, discussing how CES can help treat PTSD at FoxNews

An Answer?

Fortunately, there is a nondrug option with a proven track record in treating anxiety, depression, and insomnia which are the primary symptoms of PTSD. It’s called cranial electrotherapy stimulation, or CES. It’s an electronic device that is simple to use, has no side effects, and has been validated by decades of research. CES is currently being prescribed for active duty personnel returning from the mid-east at the Warrior Combat Stress Reset Program at Ft. Hood, TX, at Ft. Campbell, KY, Ft. Joint Ft Lewis-McChord, WA, at the Bremerton WA Naval Hospital, as well as in combat conditions in Iraq and Afghanistan. It should not stop there.

Operation Pro-Vet: How You Can Help

CES units generally retail for $350-$995. Because they are not generally covered by health insurance, they are most often out of the reach of veterans most of whom have a limited income or who are currently unemployed. Neuro-Fitness LLC, the manufacturer of the CES Ultra—in recognition of those who have given so much for their country—will now make available its CES unit at wholesale cost to veterans, not only of our current wars but our past wars as well as to their families. We are also working with Service clubs to make available units at a special low cost so that they may then be distributed to veterans in need.

To learn more about CES, visit us at our website: www.cesultra.com. To learn more about the program, call us at 1-425-222-0830 or email us today at sales@ cesultra.com for more information and how your local group or organization can become part of this program to assist those who have served on our behalf. They deserve nothing less.