Tag Archives: ces

Happy Thanksgiving: What I’m Thankful For

Thanksgiving is here, so our minds have turned
To what time has taught us, to what we’ve learned:
We often focus all our thought
On shiny things we’ve shopped and bought.
We take our pleasure in material things,
Forgetting the pleasure that friendship brings.
If a lot of our stuff just vanished today,
We’d see the foundation of each happy day
Is special relationships, constant and true,
And that’s when our thoughts go directly to you.

We wish you a Thanksgiving you’ll never forget,
Full of love and joy—your best one yet!

Kids on Drugs ( Thanks to Parents and Doctors) – part 2

Part 2: How CES, the Drug Free Alternative, Can Make a Difference

Part 1

One Parent’s Experience

CES Ultra Improves Sleep, Reduces Anxiety, Irritability, and Depression in 14-year-old Male

We’ve been doing a trial with the CES Ultra the past week. The subject was DS*, our 14 year old with diagnosed insomnia, anxiety, and depression. He used the unit for 20 minutes per day, at bedtime.

I would rate the improvement in apparent anxiety and depression to be significant. Anxieties are no longer a major topic of discussion. DS is starting to leave the house on his own for activities other than school. He’s walked outside for exercise many days since starting the program. Last night he performed with his school orchestra and said he didn’t feel strung out about it like he usually has in the past. He settled down well afterwards, which is a first.

Insomnia has shown moderate improvement. We had hoped for more improvement in that department, but perhaps we will see this continue over a longer term. DS does like to use it at bedtime, finds it easier to fall asleep. He is no longer asking for a prescription for sleeping pills. But still some early-morning wakening, etc.

My DH and I find our son more talkative, less defensive, and quite a bit more mellow in the past week. That is something we have not seen for a long time. Irritability has been markedly decreased … now closer to normal teenage irritability than what we endured before. I suspect the reduced anxiety and reduced depression are contributing to the mellower kid.

Side effects: DS feels dozy after using it. Would not do a treatment just before driver’s ed. No negative side effects otherwise noted.

Our family gives CES an “A” grade and a “thumbs up.” The unit’s positive effect on our anxious, depressed, irritable, insomniac teen has taken a lot of stress off of the entire family. And I must add, finding a psych doc who gave us a free (with consult) week-long trial period on the device was very helpful before making the full investment in purchase, which we plan to do.

* (For the sake of privacy, identities are withheld.)

Brief Research Study

Smith, Ray B., McCusker, Charles F., Jones, Ruth G., and Goates, Delbert T.  The use of cranial electrotherapy stimulation in the treatment of stress related attention deficit disorder, with an eighteen month follow up. Unpublished, 1991 and follow-up in 1993.

This study compared the effects of 3 randomly assigned CES devices which had marked differences in electrical stimulation parameters, in the treatment of stress related attention deficit disorder in 23 children and adults, 9 males, 14 females, 9 – 56 years old (average 30.96) with an average education level of 10.56 years. All had been diagnosed as having generalized anxiety disorder (61%), and/or depression (45%), and/or dysthymia (17%). 8 had a primary diagnosis of ADD. CES treatments were given daily, 45 minutes per day for 3 weeks. All 3 CES devices were equally effective based on Duncan’s Range test in significantly (P<.001) reducing depression as measured on the IPAT depression scale (mean of 19.38 ± 8.44 pretest to 13.19 ± 7.00 post test), state and trait anxiety scales of the STAI (mean state anxiety was reduced from 39.95 ± 11.78 pretest to 29.76 ± 6.99 post test, and the mean trait anxiety was reduced from 43.90 ± 11.31 pretest to 32.19 ± 7.50 post test), and in increasing the Verbal pretest (mean of 99.38 ± 13.20 to post test of 107.50 ± 14.13), Performance (mean of 107.4 ± 15.05 to 126.6 ± 14.2 ), and Full Scale I.Q. scores on the WISC-R or WAIS-R IQ tests (mean of 103.2 ± 13.7 to 117.6 ± 14.28). The authors concluded that in the unlikely event that our findings are the results of placebo effect alone, a CES device, retailing at approximately $795, would still be a relatively inexpensive and apparently reliable treatment for such a debilitating disorder as stress related ADD. On 18 month follow up, the pts performed as well or better than in the original study, the Full Scale IQ had not moved significantly from where it was after the first 3 weeks of treatment, the Performance IQ fell back slightly, while the Verbal IQ continued to increase. There did not seem to be any pattern of addiction to or over dependence on the CES device. There was no side effects except for 1 pt who cried during treatments, and 1 who was sore behind the ears when the electrode gel began drying out.

The cornerstone tenet of medicine is “Do no harm.” Don’t you owe it to your child to try a safe, effective, non-invasive approach before turning to drugs? Consider the CES Ultra.

Another Therapist Reports: CES Intervention Diffuses Anger, Decreases Hyper-Irritability, & Improves Health of 21-year-old Female College Student after Other Therapies Fail.

Operation Pro-Vet

The Problem

Tens of thousands of Iraqi and Afghan veterans have returned home from the wars with a debilitating condition: post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The VA is at loose ends about how to deal with a mental health crisis that is ruining not only the lives of returning vets, but those of their families and friends as well. Drug therapy, which is the main way they have treated the problem, has proven to be not only ineffective, but has worsened the situation, triggering an extraordinary spike in substance abuse, leading to violent behaviors and suicide.

cranial-stimulation-prevent-suicide

Read Brig. General (Ret) Stephen Xenakis MD, on the plight of our veterans at Huffingtonpost

Watch General Xenakis on Fox News, discussing how CES can help treat PTSD at FoxNews

An Answer?

Fortunately, there is a nondrug option with a proven track record in treating anxiety, depression, and insomnia which are the primary symptoms of PTSD. It’s called cranial electrotherapy stimulation, or CES. It’s an electronic device that is simple to use, has no side effects, and has been validated by decades of research. CES is currently being prescribed for active duty personnel returning from the mid-east at the Warrior Combat Stress Reset Program at Ft. Hood, TX, at Ft. Campbell, KY, Ft. Joint Ft Lewis-McChord, WA, at the Bremerton WA Naval Hospital, as well as in combat conditions in Iraq and Afghanistan. It should not stop there.

Operation Pro-Vet: How You Can Help

CES units generally retail for $350-$995. Because they are not generally covered by health insurance, they are most often out of the reach of veterans most of whom have a limited income or who are currently unemployed. Neuro-Fitness LLC, the manufacturer of the CES Ultra—in recognition of those who have given so much for their country—will now make available its CES unit at wholesale cost to veterans, not only of our current wars but our past wars as well as to their families. We are also working with Service clubs to make available units at a special low cost so that they may then be distributed to veterans in need.

To learn more about CES, visit us at our website: www.cesultra.com. To learn more about the program, call us at 1-866-937-4237 or email us today at sales@ cesultra.com for more information and how your local group or organization can become part of this program to assist those who have served on our behalf. They deserve nothing less.

A View from the Trenches: Why Psychiatry needs CES – Part 1

Why Psychiatry needs CES
by Jason Worchel, M.D.

Jason Worchel, M.D. is a noted psychiatrist and Director of the Hilo Mental Health Center in Hilo, HI. The following posts are taken from a paper written by Dr. Worchel in his testimony before the F.D.A. concerning the effectiveness and safety of CES from the perspective of a practicing psychiatrist.

The Challenge of Psycho-Pharmacology

As a practicing psychiatrist, I am constantly struggling with balancing purported efficacy with known risks of somatic interventions. While currently approved interventions have demonstrated efficacy relative to placebo, the rate of improvement with placebo remains consistently above 30%.

With the increasing prevalence of polypharmacy, there is an increasing risk of adverse side effects for the statistical hope for improved outcomes as demonstrated in clinical trials conducted with select populations in controlled environments. In addition to evaluating the risk/benefits of various treatments, I know from multiple studies most patients are not adherent to the prescribed medication regimens and discontinue medications altogether within a relatively short period of time.

Though my goal is to treat the presenting illness or alleviate its symptoms, my primary duty to my patients is to “do no harm.” This typically results in an approach that follows a spectrum of interventions with initial treatments being those with the least risk of adverse side effects.

There is no risk conventional interventions that currently constitute the standard of care will be bypassed by using CES.

Experience

I have worked with primary care physicians in our federally qualified health clinics on the Big Island. They, like others across the country, are stymied and frustrated by the challenge of treating chronic pain.

In particular, they face patients with bona fide pain but who also have depression, anxiety, insomnia and substance abuse. With regards to treatment interventions, they are damned if the do and damned if the don’t treatment with various classes of analgesic medications, including narcotic medications.

They are particularly afraid of the increasing fatalities occurring with the use of narcotic analgesic medications in combination with benzodiazepines and antidepressant medications. They welcome alternatives to medications for those patients whose emotional distress intensifies their suffering and pain sensation. CES could provide a safe alternative for them that do not currently exist.

In summary, CES represents as safe intervention for conditions for which existing treatments, especially pharmacologic and invasive interventions pose significant risk for adverse side effects. It is especially beneficial in defined populations. These include those who refuse medications and psychotherapy, dual diagnosed patients, geriatric patients, females of child bearing age and during pregnancy.

Advantages of CES

I would like to highlight various advantages of CES relative to other existing treatments, especially medications that may not be well appreciated. Take for example, the difficulty faced by primary care physicians and mental health professionals in treating female patients of child bearing age. All available medications have teratogenic risk and are not recommended during pregnancy and breast feeding. Patients desiring to become pregnant have justified concerns about taking psychotropic medication

cesultra, ces ultra, cranial electrotherapy How To

Current treatment algorithms encourage polypharmacy when initial treatments with a single drug are not effective. While there is some increased response, polypharmacy only increases the side effects burden and can result in untoward drug/drug interactions. These types of problems do not occur with CES.

Many psychotropic medications for the treatments of depression, anxiety and insomnia have discontinuation syndromes. Given the high rate of discontinuation of these medications by patients due to side effects and lack of efficacy, many patients unfortunately suffer when the take a medication prescribed to alleviate their suffering. This does not occur with CES. There are circumstances, for example prior to surgery, when certain psychotropic medications are required to be discontinued. CES does not have to be discontinued prior to surgery.

One my greatest concerns in treating patients with depression, anxiety and insomnia involves suicide. We know increased risk of suicide in depressed patients but it is often global insomnia is a significant risk factor for suicide as well as anxiety/agitation. Although safer than the older tricyclic and tetracylcic antidepressants, the current medications carry a significant risk of death in overdose, especially when combined with other analgesic medications. Too often, the medications we prescribed to prevent suicide become a means through which the patient attempts suicide. In fact, there are black box warnings that these medications may increase suicidal impulses, especially in adolescents. CES does not pose this risk.

As in many developed countries, we are an aging population. The treatment of depression, anxiety and insomnia in the geriatric patients with medications present unique challenges due to the increased risk of adverse side effects. These side effects include the risk of falls and motor vehicle accidents. Again, the number of medications taken in our geriatric patients continues to increase. Thus risk of adding psychotropic medications to their other medications poses additional drug/drug interactions and side effect burden.

CES avoids this disadvantage and provides a safe alternative to patients, their families and care givers. Furthermore, missing a CES treatment does not carry the risks of missing doses of psychotropic medications in this population.

CES Ultra research – read more – http://www.cesultra.com/research-resources.htm

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) & Depression

Questions for You

  • Is your life not as fulfilling as you’d like?
  • Do you feel empty, angry, lonely, or just tired all the time?
  • Wish you had more zest?
  • Has life lost its meaning?

Sadness or downswings in mood are normal reactions to life’s struggles, setbacks, and disappointments. Many people use the word “depression” to explain these kinds of feelings, but depression is much more than just sadness. They may mostly feel lifeless, empty, and apathetic; or even feel angry, aggressive, and restless.

Whatever the symptoms, depression is different from normal sadness in that it engulfs your day-to-day life, interfering with your ability to work, study, eat, sleep, and have fun. The feelings of helplessness, hopelessness, and worthlessness are often intense and unrelenting, with little, if any, relief.

The NIH lists several signs and symptoms of depression:

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” feelings
  • Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Irritability, restlessness
  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable, including sex
  • Fatigue and decreased energy
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping
  • Overeating, or appetite loss
  • Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts
  • Aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment

The causes and risk factor for depression are many and far ranging. They include but are not limited to loneliness lack of social support, recent stressful life experiences, family history of depression, marital or relationship problems, financial strain, early childhood trauma or abuse, alcohol or drug abuse, unemployment or underemployment, and health problems or chronic pain.

Depression is readily treatable, although finding the right treatment that works for you can sometimes take time. Specific treatment options include psychotherapy, hospitalization, medications, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and self-help.

Depression and Neurochemistry

Depression has been linked to problems or imbalances in the brain, specifically with regard to the neurotransmitters serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. The evidence is somewhat indirect on these points because it is very difficult to actually measure the level of neurotransmitter in a person’s brain. What we do know is that antidepressant medications (used to treat the symptoms of depression) are known to act upon these particular neurotransmitters and their receptors.

The neurotransmitter serotonin is involved in regulating many important physiological (body-oriented) functions, including sleep, aggression, eating, sexual behavior, and mood. Serotonin is produced by serotonergic neurons. Current research suggests that a decrease in the production of serotonin by these neurons can cause depression in some people, and more specifically, a mood state that can cause some people to feel suicidal.

Drugs, however, have many negative side effects. Other options need to be considered. People who are depressed need a safe way to restore the neurochemistry (NC) of their central nervous system.

Everyone’s neurochemistry (NC) is slightly different than everyone else’s, but everyone is addicted to their own NC. If your NC is that of a depressed person, you need to reverse it. Your brain needs to learn how to go back where it once was by restoring it to a proper balance.

Your neurotransmitter activity is very much a function of the electrical activity in your brain. CES can help get your brain electrical activity functioning normally, thus helping return your NC back to pre-stress homeostasis. Once your brain’s receptors start calling for the rebalanced levels, you’ll return to what was normal for you in the past. And your depression should ebb.

The CES Ultra, using Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES), can bring you true relief. It’s a proven way to treat feelings of depression-without using drugs. Studies show that approximately 70% of people with depression who use the CES Ultra find 70% relief of their symptoms.

beat-rain-depression-with-cesultra
Beat the Rainy Day Blues with CES Ultra

CES has no withdrawal symptoms, unlike most drugs. It also has not negative side-effects. You can also use the CES Ultra while still on your medication. In fact, don’t go off your medication until your doctor tells you to do so.