Tag Archives: cranial electrical stimulation

Coping with Winter Depression

Depression is a chemical habit of the brain. Everyone’s neurochemistry (NC) is slightly different, but everyone is addicted to their own NC. If your NC is that of a depressed person, you need to reverse it. Your brain needs to learn how to go back where it was and start making the NC it used to make. With CES, your brain will remember how to make what it needs. Once your brain’s receptors start calling for the rebalanced levels, you’ll return what was normal for you in the past. Your depression will ebb away.

Winter depression is not a myth

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Despite the fact that millions of us say we’ve suffered a winter-related low mood, it can feel as though the winter blues is just a myth. But there’s sound scientific evidence to support the idea that the season can affect our moods.

Most scientists believe that the problem is related to the way the body responds to daylight. Alison Kerry, from the mental health charity MIND, says: “With SAD, one theory is that light entering the eye causes changes in hormone levels in the body. In our bodies, light functions to stop the production of the sleep hormone melatonin, making us wake up.

“It’s thought that SAD sufferers are affected by shorter daylight hours in the winter. They produce higher melatonin, causing lethargy and symptoms of depression.”

If you’re going through a bout of winter blues, lack of daylight is probably playing a part.

Long-term depression happens over a period of time, but now you can get your brain to work for you again. The CES Ultra, using Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES), can bring you true relief. It’s a proven way to treat feelings of depression—without using drugs. Studies show that approximately 70% of people with depression who use the CES Ultra find relief of their symptoms.

Transcranial Direct Stimulation v. Cranial Stimulation

It is perhaps time to set the record straight about transcranial direct current stimulation, commonly known as tDCS and the sudden rush to embrace this new technology.

There is a serious misunderstanding which should be done away with at the outset. tDCS is not ECT ( electro-convulsive therapy). We are talking instead about a totally different modality. Further, within that modality, yet another distinction should be made. There is tDCS ( transcranial direct current stimulation) and CES (cranial electrical stimulation) which is based not on DC but on AC ( alternating Current).

Much of the current ( no pun intended) hoo-hah is about tDCS  and specifically the device being marketed by foc.us. It is based on research of a dubious nature and promoted as a new hula-hoop for the mind for gamers and those hoping for a quick cognitive fix.

Though it affects the human condition, the FDA has not intervened to regulate the device, primarily because its sponsors make no medical claims. It has also not been adequately tested for safety, though the amperage, being as low as it is in all probability harmless. Due to the absence of studies, very little is known about the long term effects of tDCS on developing brains.

CES ( cranial electrotherapy stimulation) is also a hand-held electronic device that is simple to use and has no side effects. Unlike tDCS, however, CES, however, has been around for more than half a century, has a substantial body of solid scientific research behind it, as well as an unblemished safety track record. CES manufacturers are registered and monitored by the FDA and are allowed to make claims for their device for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and insomnia. Though no claims are made about enhanced cognitive functioning, results demonstrate gains in that realm as well.

cesultra cranial electrical stimulation

Common sense says that cognition is very much a function of those states. If you are less anxious and depressed and getting a good night’s sleep, your cognitive     functioning improves as well. Conversely, the more stressed out you are, the less able you are to think clearly. It is somewhat depressing as one who has worked in the field for more than 35 years to encounter a discussion on the brain and electrical activity and hear not a word about CES. Incidentally, at a time when our veterans are struggling to find a non-drug solution to PTSD, CES is being currently used exactly for that purpose, being prescribed for active duty personnel returning from the mid-east at the Warrior Combat Stress Reset Program at Ft. Hood, TX, at Ft. Campbell, KY, Ft. Joint Ft Lewis-McChord, WA, at the Bremerton WA Naval Hospital, as well as in combat conditions in Iraq and Afghanistan. When it comes to employing gentle electrical stimulation for the treatment of depression, anxiety, and insomnia as well as an associated upswing in cognitive functioning, using a government regulated modality, CES is clearly the only viable option.

CES being used in pain clinics

CES units were becoming more widely used in pain clinics at the dawning of the 21st century. The clinics typically do not wait for pain studies to be completed, but simply try CES with their patients to see what effect they can observe, then compare it with their historical experience with those same types of patients. A typical such clinic is one just outside Dallas, Texas. A nursing assistant puts CES electrodes on patients as they enter the waiting room to await their turn with physicians or other therapists. The wait can vary from a few minutes to a half hour, depending on the patient load at a given time. The patients complete a 10 point self rated pain score prior to receiving CES. When they are called into treatment by the treatment staff, the CES is removed, the amount of time they were on the device is recorded, as a post CES self rated pain score if obtained.

The clinic has become so enthusiastic about the results, that this protocol has become a permanent part of their core treatment program. They now enthusiastically prescribe CES home units for their large number of patients who now request them, and the staff reports their clinic is much more effectively treating chronic pain than they were previously.

Pain clinic treatment results have been published, however. An interesting CES study was completed in a pain clinic near Bombay, India, in 2001. It was an open clinical trial of CES, used alone as a treatment of pain patients who had been refractory to all other previous efforts of treatment of their pain at the clinic. They were given CES treatments one hour per day, 5 days a week, for three weeks. They were asked to rate their pain level on a VAS scale of 0 to 10, with 10 being the most intense pain. Following treatment their mean self reported pain level had been reduced by 62%. Analyzing the data for individual patients it was found that 15% of the patients did not respond to the treatment, 30% gained total relief, while the remainder of the patients claimed significant relief ranging from 33% to 94%.

CES (Cranial Electrotherapy) Studies of Cognitive Function

Executive Summary. Thirteen studies, in which a total of 648 patients with various types of cognitive dysfunction were treated with cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES), were combined statistically in order to get a more confident look at the effectiveness of CES for treating this condition. While many of the studies were of the classic double blind protocol, others used either the single blind or open clinical trial. The result of the analysis showed that the overall effectiveness of CES was 44% improvement.

In most of the studies, cognitive confusion was but one symptom within a larger syndrome. For example, in most of the studies, substance abuse was the presenting syndrome, while in three of the 13 studies, fibromyalgia was the presenting syndrome. And while all presented symptoms of cognitive confusion of some type, it is obvious from the above secondary analysis, that the cognitive dysfunction among the substance abuse patients was very likely of a different, physiological etiology than that of the fibromyalgia patients, who may have been experiencing cognitive distraction due to the stress of the unrelenting pain of their condition.

Researchers earlier received a strong impetus to study CES in substance abuse patients when in the 1970s it was found that the abstinence syndrome, including such features as depression, anxiety and insomnia, was seen to come under control very quickly with CES. Serendipitously it was also discovered that what had up until the 1980s been termed “permanent brain damage” in these patients responded to three weeks of CES treatment by bringing these patients back within the normal functioning range.

A word about the study types. In the open clinical study, the patients know they are being actively treated for their level of cognitive functioning, the clinicians know who is being treated, and the statistician who summarizes the study data also knows, since there is only one group of patients.

In the single blind study, the patients do not know which are getting treated and which are getting sham treatment, but the clinician providing the treatment knows which are the treated patients. In the single blind study, the clinician doing the post study evaluation of the patients is often blinded to treatment conditions when he completes his evaluation. The statistician is usually blinded also, so that he is given two sets of scores to compare, and doesn’t know which group received the treatment. This study design was used earlier on before treatment blinding devices came on stream. In such studies, the treatment was administered sub sensation threshold, in which the clinician turned up the current intensity until the patient just felt it, then turned it back down until the patient said he could no longer feel the stimulation. At that point, the clinician either left the current at that level or turned the unit off (down to, but not including the final click). Because both the patients and the statistician are both blind to the study conditions, some authors have unwittingly published this design as a double blind experiment. But that term is generally reserved for the true double blind experimental design as described next.

The double blind study, the gold standard of science, is usually confined to studies in which neither the patient nor the clinician knows who is being studied. Those designs became available when a double blinding box could be inserted between the patient and the CES device. The double blinding box often had three, four or more settings in addition to a “0” setting in which current flowed freely between the CES unit and the patient. Among the other settings available, some passed current to the patient and some blocked it entirely. The clinician would begin the double blind treatment session by setting all double blinding boxes to the “0” position, would connect the patient to the CES electrodes, turn the current up slowly until the patient signaled he could just feel it, then reduce the stimulus level until the patient signaled that he could no longer feel it. At that point, the clinician set the double blinding box to one of the other settings available and left the patient on the device for 30 minutes to an hour, not knowing who was receiving actual treatment..

Interestingly, in a good double blind experimental design, such as was the case in the majority of those reported in the table, the persons who were responsible for measuring or rating patient improvement were also blind as to whom was treated, as was the statistician who was given anonymous groups of data to analyze. Note that, in effect, that makes such studies quadruple blind, but that term is not used in science.

In the crossover design, half the patients get treated the first week or two of the study, while the other half receive sham treatment. In the second half of the study, the formerly treated patients now receive sham treatment while the formerly sham treated patients receive treatment. If the crossover does not involve a sham treatment condition, then the crossover study is treated as an open clinical trial where all patients and staff know who is being treated at each cross of the study. That design is often referred to as a study with “wait in line” controls, in that the patients waiting to begin treatment are tested before and at the end of the waiting period before going into treatment. That is thought to control for environmental factors such as unusual stressors on the 10 O’clock news, any local dramatic weather changes, and so forth.

By Ray B. Smith, Ph. D.

Operation Pro-Vet

The Problem

Tens of thousands of Iraqi and Afghan veterans have returned home from the wars with a debilitating condition: post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The VA is at loose ends about how to deal with a mental health crisis that is ruining not only the lives of returning vets, but those of their families and friends as well. Drug therapy, which is the main way they have treated the problem, has proven to be not only ineffective, but has worsened the situation, triggering an extraordinary spike in substance abuse, leading to violent behaviors and suicide.

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Read Brig. General (Ret) Stephen Xenakis MD, on the plight of our veterans at Huffingtonpost

Watch General Xenakis on Fox News, discussing how CES can help treat PTSD at FoxNews

An Answer?

Fortunately, there is a nondrug option with a proven track record in treating anxiety, depression, and insomnia which are the primary symptoms of PTSD. It’s called cranial electrotherapy stimulation, or CES. It’s an electronic device that is simple to use, has no side effects, and has been validated by decades of research. CES is currently being prescribed for active duty personnel returning from the mid-east at the Warrior Combat Stress Reset Program at Ft. Hood, TX, at Ft. Campbell, KY, Ft. Joint Ft Lewis-McChord, WA, at the Bremerton WA Naval Hospital, as well as in combat conditions in Iraq and Afghanistan. It should not stop there.

Operation Pro-Vet: How You Can Help

CES units generally retail for $350-$995. Because they are not generally covered by health insurance, they are most often out of the reach of veterans most of whom have a limited income or who are currently unemployed. Neuro-Fitness LLC, the manufacturer of the CES Ultra—in recognition of those who have given so much for their country—will now make available its CES unit at wholesale cost to veterans, not only of our current wars but our past wars as well as to their families. We are also working with Service clubs to make available units at a special low cost so that they may then be distributed to veterans in need.

To learn more about CES, visit us at our website: www.cesultra.com. To learn more about the program, call us at 1-425-222-0830 or email us today at sales@ cesultra.com for more information and how your local group or organization can become part of this program to assist those who have served on our behalf. They deserve nothing less.