Monthly Archives: February 2019

The history of the medical use of electricity

electric sleep machine

The history of the medical use of electricity goes back more than 2000 years.  In AD 46, the Roman physician, Scribonius Largus wrote his Compositiones Medicae,  recommending patients stand on a live black torpedo fish to relieve gout and other pain.  To do this they waded out into shallow water in the ocean and stood on the fish (presumably against its will).

Much later, Claudius Galen (131-201 AD) was still recommending the use of shock from electrical fish for various medical therapies.  Galen’s word was “law” in medical circles for several thousand years, as was his recommended use of electric fish.

Electricity was not generally known and used separately (from fish) in medicine until the 1700s, when various medical devices were developed and used.  An earlier researcher developed an electrical device that could be used to shock a heart that had stopped beating into beating again.  The church stopped that treatment very quickly by saying that bringing dead people back to life was the work of the devil.

By the time John Wesley and his brother and their friends left the Anglican Church and began Methodism which took the Word directly to the people in the streets of London, they also set up medical clinics for the treatment of the indigent.  In each of those clinics they installed electrical treatment devices.

By the turn of the 20th century, the vast majority – some say more than 90% – of physician’s offices in large U.S. cities, such as New York City, had electrical treatment devices on hand.

CES from the early 1900s to 1953 and beyond

While electricity had been used in medicine for some time, in the early 1900s researchers in Europe began trying to find a way to use electricity to put people to sleep.  They tried different pulse rates, various intensities of stimulation, direct and alternating (biphasic) current and so forth.  They found that if they used a strong enough current, they could put patients into unconsciousness, but the patient tended to regain consciousness the minute the current was turned off.

electrosleep

In 1953 Russian scientists began using 100 pulses per second, limited to from 1 to 4 milliamperes of current, which tended to relax patients and allow them to proceed to a restful sleep.  Current was passed through the head with an electrode over each closed eyelid and one over each mastoid process behind the ears.  The device was the Somniatron, and the treatment was called “electrosleep.”

Chionophobia and how to cope with it

Fresh, deep snow blanketing a home, yard and evergreen trees
Fresh, Deep Snow Blanketing A Home, Yard And Evergreen Trees

Chionophobia is defined as an intense fear of snow. As in most phobias, Chionophobia is driven by anxiety and categorized as a Natural Environment Phobia. According to a study carried out by the American Meteorological Society, Chionophobia is the second most prevalent Natural Environment Phobia subtype.

The name originates from Greek chion meaning snow and phobia meaning fear, aversion or dread. People with Chionophobia often understand that their fear is unfounded. Regardless of logic, those who suffer are unable to halt its symptoms.

Overview

Chionophobia is not just a dislike of snow or a rational fear of severe weather forecasts. It incorporates an irrational fear of snow that is typically linked to a fear of bodily harm or death. Though phobias can and do manifest themselves differently in different people’s experiences, there are typically two primary fears behind Chionophobia: the fear of becoming snowbound and the fear of being stranded in snow.

Chionophobia Symptoms

Like all phobias, Chionophobia can bring rise to a variety of symptoms, most commonly:

  • Paying undue attention to weather reports
  • Refusing to leave home during snowy weather
  • Experiencing panic attacks.

For people with true Chionophobia, the mere forecast of a winter storm or snowfall can induce the physiological symptoms of fear, anxiety-like cold sweats, panic attacks, and unrealistic feelings of doom.

Coping With Chionophobia

The best methods for coping with the fear of snow depend on the severity and the level of impact that the fear has on one’s life. Sufferers of Chionophobia often find that becoming educated about different types of snow and their effects on local conditions can calm their fears. Others find that gradual exposure to winter activities can be helpful. Living with Chionophobia is difficult. Friends and family are often non-empathetic to the irrationality of it’s effects. However, for the phobic it is real and serious phobia that interferes with everyday life.

If the associated fear were to become severe or life-limiting, it is wise to seek the guidance of a trained mental health professional. Winter weather is a fact of life. With proper assistance and the right tools, symptoms of Chionophobia can be lessened, thus improving one’s quality of life.

When thoughts of an oncoming storm begin to make one anxious, the progression of the anxiety can be halted through the use of Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES). CES works by using a light electrical frequency for balancing neuro-chemistry. Some CES users experience relief immediately during the course of treatment, particularly if use has gone on daily for a week or so. CES results are accumulative and lasting.

The effect of CES use differs from pharmaceutical treatments in that users report not only being more relaxed but that their minds seem more alert and clear. Unlike drugs, CES has no negative side effects and it is non-addictive. CES can be used safely as often as you like.

CES Ultra – U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Regulated and Registered

The CES Ultra is an FDA regulated and registered CES device for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and insomnia. Experience the anxiety-reducing benefits of the CES Ultra device when coping with a fear of snow.

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Rated 4.8/5 based on 18 user reviews

…just the thoughts of going to sleep had become a great source of daily stress and anxiety for me. So bad was this problem that when it was actually time for me to go to bed… I would lie there wide awake for hours. The CES Ultra gave me my life back, and I feel like a new person again.

Wayne R.

Citations

Last Modified: August 18, 2020