Tag Archives: depression

Coping with Winter Depression

Depression is a chemical habit of the brain. Everyone’s neurochemistry (NC) is slightly different, but everyone is addicted to their own NC. If your NC is that of a depressed person, you need to reverse it. Your brain needs to learn how to go back where it was and start making the NC it used to make. With CES, your brain will remember how to make what it needs. Once your brain’s receptors start calling for the rebalanced levels, you’ll return what was normal for you in the past. Your depression will ebb away.

Winter depression is not a myth

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Despite the fact that millions of us say we’ve suffered a winter-related low mood, it can feel as though the winter blues is just a myth. But there’s sound scientific evidence to support the idea that the season can affect our moods.

Most scientists believe that the problem is related to the way the body responds to daylight. Alison Kerry, from the mental health charity MIND, says: “With SAD, one theory is that light entering the eye causes changes in hormone levels in the body. In our bodies, light functions to stop the production of the sleep hormone melatonin, making us wake up.

“It’s thought that SAD sufferers are affected by shorter daylight hours in the winter. They produce higher melatonin, causing lethargy and symptoms of depression.”

If you’re going through a bout of winter blues, lack of daylight is probably playing a part.

Long-term depression happens over a period of time, but now you can get your brain to work for you again. The CES Ultra, using Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES), can bring you true relief. It’s a proven way to treat feelings of depression—without using drugs. Studies show that approximately 70% of people with depression who use the CES Ultra find relief of their symptoms.

CES as an effective treatment for pain

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation, which has been in use around the world since the early 1950s is an FDA recognized treatment of anxiety, depression and insomnia.  Many patients and their physicians have also discovered that it is a very effective treatment for pain.

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It has been theorized that CES is effective in pain treatment because it is known to relieve stress, and stress is known to be a strong correlate of the perception of pain in pain patients.

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Recently it has been shown that pain is also a frequent accompaniment of depression, which CES is known to treat very effectively. In one study more than 75% of patients being treated for depression reported experiencing chronic, or recurring pain, and 30% to 60% of pain patients studied, also reported significant depression.

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Presented by cesultra.com

Why is a New Treatment for Depression so Essential? And How the CES Ultra May Be the Answer

Depression in adulthood remains a common and often under-treated condition.

Depression can occur at any age, but it typically emerges in the mid-20s. Women experience depression twice as frequently as men, and symptoms can vary from mild to severe. Major depressive disorder, which may be diagnosed when depressive symptoms last for 2 weeks or more, is understood to occur in 15 to 17 percent of the population.

Symptoms of major depressive disorder can include a depressed mood, loss of interest and enjoyment, reduced energy, increased fatigue, diminished activity and reduced concentration and attention.

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These and other symptoms, particularly when prolonged, impair a person’s ability to function in day-to-day life, making effective treatment essential.

Research continues to improve our knowledge about the impact of depression on our ability to process information and the underlying processes in the brain that are associated with depressive symptoms.

With increased information, psychologists and mental health professionals have made significant progress in identifying effective treatments.  A combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and medication has evolved the most effective treatment to date.

However, it is not fully understood exactly how and why antidepressants work. And despite significant advancements in medications, treating major depressive disorder remains a challenge. Although medication helps, it can be costly and produce troublesome side effects.

Recent Advances in Electrical Treatments

Noninvasive brain stimulation, such as CES have been increasingly investigated for the treatment of major depression.

Long-term depression happens over a period of time, but now you can get your brain to work for you again. The CES Ultra, using Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES), can bring you true relief. It’s a proven way to treat feelings of depression—without using drugsStudies show that approximately 70% of people with depression who use the CES Ultra find 70% relief of their symptoms.

You can use the CES Ultra while still on your medication. In fact, don’t go off your medication until your doctor says so. With the CES Ultra, you also have personalized telephone support to ensure that you get the full relief and results. CES has no withdrawal symptoms, as most drugs do. Explore its possibilities today.

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) & Depression

Questions for You

  • Is your life not as fulfilling as you’d like?
  • Do you feel empty, angry, lonely, or just tired all the time?
  • Wish you had more zest?
  • Has life lost its meaning?

Sadness or downswings in mood are normal reactions to life’s struggles, setbacks, and disappointments. Many people use the word “depression” to explain these kinds of feelings, but depression is much more than just sadness. They may mostly feel lifeless, empty, and apathetic; or even feel angry, aggressive, and restless.

Whatever the symptoms, depression is different from normal sadness in that it engulfs your day-to-day life, interfering with your ability to work, study, eat, sleep, and have fun. The feelings of helplessness, hopelessness, and worthlessness are often intense and unrelenting, with little, if any, relief.

The NIH lists several signs and symptoms of depression:

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” feelings
  • Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Irritability, restlessness
  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable, including sex
  • Fatigue and decreased energy
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping
  • Overeating, or appetite loss
  • Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts
  • Aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment

The causes and risk factor for depression are many and far ranging. They include but are not limited to loneliness lack of social support, recent stressful life experiences, family history of depression, marital or relationship problems, financial strain, early childhood trauma or abuse, alcohol or drug abuse, unemployment or underemployment, and health problems or chronic pain.

Depression is readily treatable, although finding the right treatment that works for you can sometimes take time. Specific treatment options include psychotherapy, hospitalization, medications, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and self-help.

Depression and Neurochemistry

Depression has been linked to problems or imbalances in the brain, specifically with regard to the neurotransmitters serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. The evidence is somewhat indirect on these points because it is very difficult to actually measure the level of neurotransmitter in a person’s brain. What we do know is that antidepressant medications (used to treat the symptoms of depression) are known to act upon these particular neurotransmitters and their receptors.

The neurotransmitter serotonin is involved in regulating many important physiological (body-oriented) functions, including sleep, aggression, eating, sexual behavior, and mood. Serotonin is produced by serotonergic neurons. Current research suggests that a decrease in the production of serotonin by these neurons can cause depression in some people, and more specifically, a mood state that can cause some people to feel suicidal.

Drugs, however, have many negative side effects. Other options need to be considered. People who are depressed need a safe way to restore the neurochemistry (NC) of their central nervous system.

Everyone’s neurochemistry (NC) is slightly different than everyone else’s, but everyone is addicted to their own NC. If your NC is that of a depressed person, you need to reverse it. Your brain needs to learn how to go back where it once was by restoring it to a proper balance.

Your neurotransmitter activity is very much a function of the electrical activity in your brain. CES can help get your brain electrical activity functioning normally, thus helping return your NC back to pre-stress homeostasis. Once your brain’s receptors start calling for the rebalanced levels, you’ll return to what was normal for you in the past. And your depression should ebb.

The CES Ultra, using Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES), can bring you true relief. It’s a proven way to treat feelings of depression-without using drugs. Studies show that approximately 70% of people with depression who use the CES Ultra find 70% relief of their symptoms.

beat-rain-depression-with-cesultra
Beat the Rainy Day Blues with CES Ultra

CES has no withdrawal symptoms, unlike most drugs. It also has not negative side-effects. You can also use the CES Ultra while still on your medication. In fact, don’t go off your medication until your doctor tells you to do so.

Cranial Electrotherapy as alternative to drugs for depression treatment

New treatments for depression offer hope

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, nearly 7 percent of adults in the U.S. have been diagnosed with depression, costing employers anywhere between $17 billion to $44 billion as a result.

Then there are those who never get diagnosed because they never seek treatment for their depression – even though there are plenty of treatments available today that have been very successful in combating its symptoms.

Some of the treatments for depression that have proven to be effective include a wide variety of therapies, ranging from talk therapy and anti-depressant medications, to meditation and walking in the park.

The key to any successful treatment, however, requires patience because it can take 4 to 6 weeks for the anti-depressants to kick in. It also takes time to tweak dosages or otherwise switch to a different-acting anti-depressant if the first one was not effective.

But good news exists for depression, as much progress has been made, not just in treating it, but in understanding the underlying dynamics that contribute to the condition.

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As a result, there are a variety of new treatments for depression that are on the horizon, including the following:

Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) – CES administers small electric pulses across a patient’s head using a portable, battery-powered device that can be used at home. Approved by the FDA, CES provides relief from symptoms of insomnia, anxiety and depression. It is also approved for treating chronic pain.

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) – TMS involves a series of brief magnetic pulses to the brain, which are administered through an electromagnetic coil adjacent to a patient’s scalp. The pulses stimulate certain circuits in the brain that are underactive depressed patients. The goal of TMS is to activate these targeted areas of the brain to alleviate depressive symptoms and restore the brain to normal functioning.

Deep brain stimulation – Unlike other brain stimulation treatments, deep brain stimulation involves the surgical placement of a battery-operated neuro-stimulator, which is used to treat a variety of neurological symptoms. The implant is similar to a pacemaker, but instead of stimulating the heart muscle, it stimulates targeted areas of the brain. It is especially effective for patients with Parkinson’s disease, but is currently being tested for its effectiveness in treating depression.

SOURCES:
1. Psych Central, Depression: New Medications On The Horizon, Tartakovsky, M., retrieved February 4, 2014.
2. National Institute of Mental Health, Introduction: Mental Health Medications
3. Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, What is Depression?
4. Press Release: JayMac Pharmaceuticals Introduces EnLyte with Delta Folate: A Safe, Natural, & Complete Prescription Therapy For Depression, February 4, 2014.