Monthly Archives: January 2016

CES vs. Drugs

There are various advantages of CES relative to other existing treatments, especially medications that may not be well appreciated. Take for example, the difficulty faced by primary care physicians and mental health professionals in treating female patients of child bearing age. All available medications have teratogenic risk and are not recommended during pregnancy and breast feeding. Patients desiring to become pregnant have justified concerns about taking psychotropic medication

Current treatment algorithms encourage polypharmacy when initial treatments with a single drug are not effective. While there is some increased response, polypharmacy only increases the side effects burden and can result in untoward drug/drug interactions. These types of problems do not occur with CES.

Many psychotropic medications for the treatments of depression, anxiety and insomnia have discontinuation syndromes. Given the high rate of discontinuation of these medications by patients due to side effects and lack of efficacy, many patients unfortunately suffer when the take a medication prescribed to alleviate their suffering. This does not occur with CES. There are circumstances, for example prior to surgery, when certain psychotropic medications are required to be discontinued. CES does not have to be discontinued prior to surgery.

One of the greatest concerns in treating patients with depression, anxiety and insomnia involves suicide. We know there is an increased risk of suicide in depressed patients but often global insomnia is under appreciated as a significant risk factor for suicide as well. Although safer than the older tricyclic and tetracylcic antidepressants, the current medications carry a significant risk of death in overdose, especially when combined with other analgesic medications. Too often, the medications we prescribed to prevent suicide become a means through which the patient attempts suicide. In addition, there are black box warnings that these medications may increase suicidal impulses, especially in adolescents. CES does not pose this risk.

Excerpts from “A View from the Trenches” written by Jason Worchel, M.D.

More CES Research – http://www.cesultra.com/research-resources.htm

CES Potential in Organized Athletics

Everton FC are using an unusual method to get injured players fit again

The club has adopted electrical brain wave therapy, which helps pan relief and cuts recovery time

cesultra-for-sport-injuries

Top international football stars are being offered electrical brain wave therapy to speed up their recovery from injury.

Premier league side Everton have adopted the treatment, which is also used to treat patients suffering from depression.

England stars Ross Barkley and John Stones are just some of the squad among first team players who can have the revolutionary treatment.
Other top players who can benefit include Leighton Baines, Romalu Lukaku and Gareth Barry.

The mild electrical currents help players with pain relief and it helps cut recovery time from injuries by a third.

cesultra-for-sport-injuries

It involves mild electrical pulses being delivered to the brain and injured muscles to stimulate the natural healing process.
Earlobe clips or head pads deliver a mild current which helps the brain create the feel-good chemical serotonin which aids recovery.
The pads are also be attached to muscles but the therapy works better by treating both the brain and the muscles together.
Known as cranial electrotherapy stimulation it works by wiring up players to an machine which delivers Alpha waves to the different parts of the body.
Everton is the only club in the UK to use the groundbreaking treatment.

cesultra-for-sport-injuries

CES and functional MRI

Currently, one tool investigators use to determine both underlying psychopathology as well as potential mechanisms of action of various treatments involves functional MRI (fMRI). It was my (Jason Worchel, M.D.) goal to apply this type of investigation to CES. With the assistance of Neal Rudtledge, MD, a neuroradiologist in Austin, Texas, we explored the safety of using CES in a fMRI environment. Using 30 foot leads, we attached a CES unit to a phantom head within a MRI. There were no noted adverse effects to the equipment or other unusual phenomenon noted. Subsequently, I used CES on myself while undergoing a fMRI study. There were no adverse events experienced with either the equipment or to me. Though we did not have the resources to conduct a full scale research study; i.e. design a specified protocol to ascertain specific effects and provide for blinding or placebo intervention, the process did confirm that fMRI appears to be a safe modality for the study of CES.

Excerpts from “A View from the Trenches” written by Jason Worchel, M.D.

More CES Research – http://www.cesultra.com/research-resources.htm