Category Archives: Depression

CES Ultra is a non-drug approach to treatment of depression

Pressure and Stress

Efforts, challenges, threats, or perceived threats or damage (physical and/or psychological) puts pressure on our biosystem. We thrive on various pressures to experience, adapt, survive, learn, and to live. Muscles can develop from putting pressure on them and they will atrophy without that work. The same principle applies throughout our physical system, and our brain as well (emotion and intellect). We depend on pressure and grow by challenging ourselves. We will define healthy systemic pressure as eustress. This is differentiated from what we commonly call stress. In engineering terms the concept of stress say on a steel I beam in a high rise building can lead to metal fatigue and the actual physical breaking of that beam, which could potentially lead to the breaking and even collapse of that building. We will follow the convention of using stress to mean bad stress.

Despite this, please regard stress as basically good. People can subject themselves to so much exercise that they loose strength and endurance. They use up their muscle tissue faster than they rebuild it. Then the healthy stress on their muscles becomes destructive.

Chemically, we need adrenaline and choline systems, adrenergic and cholinergic systems.

We need our bodies’ hormonal systems to use and build our muscles. The body’s hormonal systems also keep a homeostatic balance.

Psychological Distress

In psychological stress, the body shifts into the fight or flight mode. Our body prepares for immediate physical action. These systems too can suffer atrophy or exhaustion. We can directly see and feel the body’s responses to some kinds of stress. We sweat and flush from muscular effort; we get goose bumps and pale skin from cold. We can even hear fatigue or shivering in a person’s voice.

Insensible Stress

Primarily hidden symptoms accompany the shift from benign to pathological stress. We cannot so easily see, hear, or feel sleeplessness, irritability, and inability to concentrate. For most of us, only mechanical medically related instruments reveal blood pressure gradually elevating to dangerous levels, and body chemistry going out of balance. Sometimes the body cannot maintain the range of temperature necessary for adequate functioning.

stress-scream

Sometimes people persist in exercising, working, or even playing to exhaustion. Either can lead to collapse and eventual death. The body also suffers other types of collapse when other types of stress press it beyond its limits.

When under stress, the brain shifts its transmitter balance. This prepares the body to deal with the stress. If the stressing agent remains present (stressful conditions on the job, in the home, etc.) the shift may become permanent. The body and the personality of the

individual can suffer from such permanent shifts away from healthy homeostasis. This brings patients to medical treatment facilities.

Depression and Neurochemistry

Depression has been linked to problems or imbalances in the brain, specifically with regard to the neurotransmitters serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. The evidence is somewhat indirect on these points because it is very difficult to actually measure the level of neurotransmitter in a person’s brain. What we do know is that antidepressant medications (used to treat the symptoms of depression) are known to act upon these particular neurotransmitters and their receptors.

The neurotransmitter serotonin is involved in regulating many important physiological (body-oriented) functions, including sleep, aggression, eating, sexual behavior, and mood. Serotonin is produced by serotonergic neurons. Current research suggests that a decrease in the production of serotonin by these neurons can cause depression in some people, and more specifically, a mood state that can cause some people to feel suicidal.

Drugs, however, have many negative side effects. Other options need to be considered. People who are depressed need a safe way to restore the neurochemistry (NC) of their central nervous system.

Everyone’s neurochemistry (NC) is slightly different than everyone else’s, but everyone is addicted to their own NC. If your NC is that of a depressed person, you need to reverse it. Your brain needs to learn how to go back where it once was by restoring it to a proper balance.

Your neurotransmitter activity is very much a function of the electrical activity in your brain. CES can help get your brain electrical activity functioning normally, thus helping return your NC back to pre-stress homeostasis. Once your brain’s receptors start calling for the rebalanced levels, you’ll return to what was normal for you in the past. And your depression should ebb.

The CES Ultra, Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES), can bring you true relief. It’s a proven way to treat feelings of depression-without using drugs. Studies show that approximately 70% of people with depression who use the CES Ultra find 70% relief of their symptoms.

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Beat the Rainy Day Blues with CES Ultra
CES has no withdrawal symptoms, unlike most drugs. It also has not negative side-effects. You can also use the CES Ultra while still on your medication. In fact, don’t go off your medication until your doctor tells you to do so.

Why Psychiatry needs CES (Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation)

INSOMNIA

Many patients benefit from improving sleep hygiene and as a treatment for insomnia.

Others may improve using a sleep phase changes or treating the underlying problem such as sleep apnea, medical conditions, alcohol abuse, etc.

For many others, recent pharmacologic treatments prove effective and have minimal side effects. Targeting melatonin receptors is a novel and promising approach.

For many persons, however, existing treatments are ineffective, too expensive, result in side effects or conflict with their desire to avoid medications. Some side effects from medications are very disturbing, such as sleep associated behaviors that result in harm to self or others. For others, there is morning sedation, drug/drug interactions or rebound insomnia. When behavioral interventions are not effective, CES could be considered prior to initiating medications.

ANXIETY

There are many non-pharmacologic interventions for reducing anxiety. Some of these include dietary supplements, acupuncture, meditation, yoga, and exercise. These interventions, however, are not employed by a large segment of society that suffers from anxiety. These persons instead seek medications from their physician to alleviate their suffering. Typical classes of medications for anxiety include the SSRI’s, benzodiazepines as well as the off label use of antihistamines and atypical antipsychotic medications and antiepileptic medications. In addition to the inherent problems with SSRI’s, there are also problems with the other classes of medications. A serious potential side effect of benzodiazepines is their potential for inducing physical and psychological dependence. In addition, withdrawal symptoms can prove life threatening, especially with the shorter acting benzodiazepines like alprazolam. When taken as directed, which is often not the case; this class of medications can result in compromised coordination, slowed reaction time, falls, disinhibition, delirium, and anterograde amnesia.

It is not uncommon to see suicide attempts involving a combination of a benzodiazepines together with alcohol and/or another sedative hypnotic. While buspirone is relatively well tolerated, it has poor efficacy and a 3 to 4 week lag time to have an effect. Medications such as gabapentin are used off label but there is no research to support its efficacy for anxiety disorders. Unfortunately, physicians have begun using the atypical antipsychotic medications to treat anxiety. This class of medications has a large and increasing number of very serious side effects. Recent attention has been focused on their causing metabolic syndrome. They frequently cause extra pyramidal side effects, sedation, elevated prolactin levels and drug/drug interactions. All of these medications should be avoided during pregnancy and used with caution in the elderly. In short, the side effect profile of current pharmacologic treatments for anxiety limits their safe use.

DEPRESSION

There is considerable controversy regarding the efficacy for evidence based treatments for depression. The controversy also involves the risk/benefit analyses of currently approved interventions. While the primary focus has been on medications, similar concerns have been raised regarding certain psychotherapies, transcranial electromagnetic stimulation, vagal nerve stimulation, ECT and herbal and dietary supplements.

Through articles published in the lay press, the general public has been apprised of the controversy involving the efficacy of antidepressant medications. For example, Time magazine recently cited Kirsch’s meta-analysis in PLoS Medicine that found little benefit of antidepressants for most patients as well as Dr. John Krystal’s findings that about 25% of patients did worse on antidepressants than on placebo”. They have been informed about the black box warnings for SSRI’s causing suicidal behaviors. One of the results of this publicity is a growing movement away from all medications to “holistic” or “folk remedies”. In fact, there many patients express fears of taking medications.

There is excellent data and clinical experience however to support the safety and lack of adverse side effects from CES and it should be included in the spectrum of available treatments as it poses very low risk of harm to patients.

Excerpts from “A View from the Trenches” written by Jason Worchel, M.D.

More CES Research – http://www.cesultra.com/research-resources.htm

CES as an effective treatment for pain

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation, which has been in use around the world since the early 1950s is an FDA recognized treatment of anxiety, depression and insomnia.  Many patients and their physicians have also discovered that it is a very effective treatment for pain.

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It has been theorized that CES is effective in pain treatment because it is known to relieve stress, and stress is known to be a strong correlate of the perception of pain in pain patients.

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Recently it has been shown that pain is also a frequent accompaniment of depression, which CES is known to treat very effectively. In one study more than 75% of patients being treated for depression reported experiencing chronic, or recurring pain, and 30% to 60% of pain patients studied, also reported significant depression.

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Presented by cesultra.com

Why Psychiatry needs CES

The prime directive – Do No Harm

The primary duty to patients should be to “do no harm”. Avoiding harm typically results in an approach that follows a spectrum of interventions beginning with treatments that pose the least risk of adverse side effects.

The harm reduction approach increases the likelihood patients will benefit without being exposed to unnecessary risks of harm. CES should be included in the spectrum of available treatments as it poses very low risk of harm to patients.

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CES as a safe and effective alternative

People worried about the use of pharmaceutical drugs should consider CES as a safe and effective alternative

The FDA has expressed concern as to utilization of CES without first employing more “conventional” treatments. Unfortunately, the more conventional treatments at times are not only ineffective but also in many circumstances contribute to a worsening of the condition or result in deleterious side effects.

This can result in necessary therapeutic alliance adversely impacted. Frequently, patients will mention the advertisements they see on television by various attorneys soliciting patients who have been harmed by approved medications, ECT or other treatments. They are worried about being harmed by prescribed treatments and become suspicious of their health care professionals.

There is excellent data and clinical experience however to support the safety and lack of adverse side effects from CES and it should be included in the spectrum of available treatments as it poses very low risk of harm to patients.

Excerpts from “A View from the Trenches” written by Jason Worchel, M.D.

More CES Research – http://www.cesultra.com/research-resources.htm