Monthly Archives: July 2015

CES Ultra as a modern “electrosleep” device

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) is the American FDA’s term for what the rest of the world calls “electrosleep.” Modern electrosleep devices originated in Russia in 1953, and arrived in the U.S. ten years later, in 1963, when they began to be researched with patients complaining of insomnia.

Various uses of small to moderate electrical currents had been researched since the early 1900s in Europe, in an attempt to see exactly what current intensity and pulse rate were required to put a patient to sleep when applied to the head. By that, they meant what was required to knock him out or force him to lose consciousness and maintain the patient in that state for a period of time. Researchers finally gave up on finding a specific type of current that would reliably put most patients to sleep. Unlike those earlier models, modern CES devices are typically pocket sized, run off of a 9 volt battery, and pulse from 100 up to 15,000 times per second. The current intensity usually is at or just below 1 mAmp, but can go up to 4 mAmp with higher pulse rates. Most would just light a flashlight bulb at best, and in the majority of clinical studies, patients have not felt the stimulation at all during treatment.

In the early 1950s Russian medical researchers were working with these very low levels of current, which they applied via two electrodes attached to the closed eyelids and two attached behind the head at the base of the skull. They were attempting to find a psychiatrically useful current, and while the current level was much too low to force a person into a sleep state, they found to their great interest that patients were claiming vastly improved sleep during nights following sessions when these very minor amounts of stimulation passed across the head. They then began studying this effect specifically, and in 1953 finally came out with the Somniatron electrosleep device.

Several similar devices were later manufactured in the U.S. for research purposes, and their clinical use began among inpatient and outpatient psychiatric patients, usually in University Teaching Hospitals. Several other Universities began research with animals in an effort to see if CES really did change how the brain functioned, if it was safe to use, and what the mechanism of action might be.

They found that the current traveled throughout the brain, that it increased production and firing of neurotransmitters in neurons,3 and that when researchers deliberately threw neurotransmitters out of balance in the brain, electrosleep would put them back in balance. Other researchers found that electrosleep would apparently also put back into balance neurotransmitters in human patients whose neurotransmitters had been thrown out of balance by various addicting substances.

By Ray B. Smith, Ph.D

Balancing the Brain or Cranial Electrical Stimulation With Brain Tuner & Bio-Tuner

Electro-therapy got its start during the days of the Roman Empire when Greek physicians had their patients stand on electric torpedo fish as a step to improve health in the first century AD. Scribonius Largus wrote: “For any type of gout a live black torpedo should, when the pain begins, be placed under the feet … in this way Anteros, a freeman of Tiberius, was cured. … Headache even if it is chronic and unbearable is taken away and remedied forever by a live black torpedo placed on the spot which is in pain, until the pain ceases.” And Claudius Galen wrote: “Therefore I thought that the torpedo should be applied alive to the person who has the headache, … and could free the patient from pain … this I found to be so.”

bio-tuner-waves

Electricity was harnessed for healing as early as 1747. A professor of experimental philosophy and mathematics in Geneva restored life to the paralyzed arm of a blacksmith using an electric current. Electricity was soon recognized as being a natural part of the life force. It was used extensively for healing until the early part of the 20th Century and the advent of the pharmaceutical industry.

In the Bakken Museum in Minneapolis, there are several models of early devices used to bring about healing by applying electrical stimulation to the brain. In modern times, research started as early as 1903 to help with insomnia. This research was known first as “Electro-sleep” and later as more applications were discovered the term “Cranial Electrical Stimulation” or CES was used.

Bob Beck won the John Fetzer Foundation pioneering award for scientific achievement in 1990 for his brain research. Bob Beck’s first Brain Tuner was called the BT5. A later model was called the BT6.

CES Ultra to help sleep better

Have you ever asked yourself any of the following questions:

  • Why don’t my sleep medications help me sleep anymore, or help me go to sleep when I take them?
  • Is there anything I can use to help me sleep better without causing side effects that impact my waking life?
  • Is there anything besides drugs that I can use to help me to sleep?

“Is There Anything that Can Help Me Sleep?”

If you are asking yourself this question, you are not alone. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers insufficient sleep to be a public heath epidemic. The CDC estimates that between 50 and 70 million people are asking, “Is there anything that can help me sleep better?” on a nightly basis.

Understanding Cranial Electro Therapy Stimulation (CES) –
A Personal Perspective

If you have ever suffered from insomnia, you know how debilitating this epidemic can be. What you may not realize is that sleep deprivation can be life threatening. The National Department of Transportation estimates drowsy driving to be responsible for 1,550 fatalities and 40,000 nonfatal injuries annually in the United States.

Sleeplessness is more than just a hassle; it is a life threatening illness that demands a solution that really works. Millions of people have searched tirelessly for a treatment that works, only to become discouraged by traditional therapies that offer no real cure, and only seek to disguise the symptoms.

If you are asking the question, “Is there anything ELSE that can help me to sleep naturally, without debilitating side effects?” then you should consider Cranial Electro Therapy Stimulation (CES).

CES treats the causes of poor sleep rather than the symptoms. People who have exhausted other methods to help them sleep are finding that CES was the answer they were seeking from the start. There are a number of reasons why CES has proven successful for people with sleep deficiencies:

  • CES uses the natural processes of the brain to reset your sleep clock, thus reestablishing your natural sleeping rhythms.
  • CES has no known side effects.
  • CES helps the brain to function naturally without introducing a chemical cocktail.
  • CES relieves the symptoms caused by insomnia, anxiety, and depression.

CES uses a gentle electrical impulse applied to the ear lobes that is anatomically transferred to the brain. The unit is handheld, and is designed to be used at home. Best of all, CES is far less expensive than the ongoing costs of drug prescriptions.

Read more –  http://www.cesultra.com/help-me-sleep-better.php

New Types of Sleepers

We hear a lot about there being two different kinds of sleepers — early risers and night owls — but researchers from the Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences have identified two new groups to add to the mix. And, perhaps not surprisingly, one of them includes people who feel tired all day long. Want to know if you fall into one of these new categories? These are the different types:

1. Early Risers
Dubbed “larks” by researchers, these individuals prefer getting up and going to sleep early over late nights. And they show higher energy levels between the hours of 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

2. Late Risers
These sleepers, also known as “night owls,” prefer to wake up late and are more alert in the evenings, and likely have a hard time functioning very early in the day. They show higher energy levels between 9 p.m. and 9 a.m.

3. High Energetic
Sticking with the study’s bird themes, we’ve dubbed this group “hummingbirds” — they have energy the entire day (lucky!), and also snoozed about 30 minutes less overall than the other three groups. And even though they averaged about 7.5 hours a night, they still felt sprightly in the morning and night.

cesultra

4. Always Tired
This group feels lethargic all day no matter how much shut-eye they get. Researchers didn’t have a bird name for this one — and frankly, they sound more like the koala (who sleeps approximately 18 to 22 hours a day).

What You Probably Didn’t Know About Sleep

a. Alcohol impacts your REM sleep.
Booze is a snooze-inducing depressant that puts you to sleep, but also lightens your sleep, says pharmacist Keith T. Veltri, clinical pharmacy manager of Montefiore Medical Center. You may still remember dreams, though, since the alcohol causes increased arousals — and you can only recall a dream when you wake up during it.

b. Some medicines interfere with your sleep.
Benadryl (or diphenhydramine), a common allergy medicine, may result in shortened REM and fewer dreams, says Veltri. Prescription drugs that can cause nightmares include beta-blockers, which are usually prescribed for high blood pressure, the Parkinson’s disease drug, Sinemet, and the smoking-cessation medication, Chantix. Some drugs, such as antidepressants and barbituates, also reduce REM sleep.